Schedule

Thursday, June 25, 2020

9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Workshop Icon Pre-Event Workshop

Advocating to key policymakers can be scary, but it doesn’t have to be.

Advocating to key policymakers can be scary, but it doesn’t have to be. In this special pre-event workshop, Americans for the Arts’ experts will walk you through how to use your individual story, the latest research and data, and some easy tips and tricks to engage with decisionmakers at the federal, state, and local level. You’ll engage in interactive workshops and discussions with fellow arts advocates-in-training and practice your angles, pitches, and messaging. Learn the how-to’s of connecting with your elected officials, reaching out effectively, saying the right thing in the room, and maintaining these crucial relationships over time. Whether you are a community organizer, arts administrator, nonprofit leader, or a dynamic changemaker in your own right, “Anyone Can Be an Arts Advocate” will equip you to be the best advocate you can be.

Who should attend: This pre-event workshop is for new or new-at-heart arts advocates looking for the skills to talk to their local, state, and/or federal elected officials—whether that’s a member of the school board or your U.S. Congressperson.

Optional free add-on: Put Your Skills into Practice on Capitol Hill: All attendees of this workshop will have the option to head to Capitol Hill on Thursday afternoon after the workshop to put your new skills into practice. To join this Hill component, attendees must also participate in one additional, virtual, free pre-training prior to arriving in Washington, DC. More information about that pre-training will be provided following registration for the Workshop.

2:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Workshop Icon Pre-Event Workshop

The Monument Lab considers what is an appropriate approach to monuments in the contemporary city. In partnership with Americans for…

The Monument Lab considers what is an appropriate approach to monuments in the contemporary city. In partnership with Americans for the Arts, Monument Lab will lead a preconference workshop to explore process, participation, and power in public art. In this moment of reinvention for the public monument, Monument Lab works with artists, students, activists, municipal agencies, and cultural institutions on exploratory approaches to public engagement and collective memory. Their methods include building prototype monuments, lead participatory open research initiatives, and convene memory workers in public spaces across cities with the goal to critically engage the public art we have inherited to reimagine public spaces through narratives of social justice and equity.

Who should attend: This workshop is designed for anyone working in public engagement and collective memory including public art administrators, artists, arts and culture leaders, placemakers and keepers, municipal agents, and more.

Learning Objectives:

  • Hear from a range of Monument Lab partners, fellows and other leaders from the field who will explore and engage participants around the central themes of the workshop
  • Learn about frameworks for municipal art offices and cultural organizations to explore new opportunities for process-based participation and outcomes for their work
  • Engage in a group charette through recent case studies from the field to seek breakthroughs while addressing inequities, parameters, and accountability measures
  • Be provided an opportunity for participants to identify exploratory pathways and actionable next steps in their own communities and within their own work.

Friday, June 26, 2020

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Networking

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Interactive icon Interactive

First time at the Annual Convention, or simply want to meet new people in a casual, fun environment? Join us for the Newcomers and New-at-Heart…

First time at the Annual Convention, or simply want to meet new people in a casual, fun environment? Join us for the Newcomers and New-at-Heart Meet-and-Greet to find a conference buddy, meet rising talent, and get your energy going before the conference kicks off!

Learning Objectives:

  • Meet new people!
  • Learn more about what the Annual Convention is, who attends, and explore the schedule of events.
  • Pick up some new ice-breaker exercises to take back home.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Interactive icon Interactive

First time at the Public Art & Civic Design Conference, or simply want to meet new people in a casual, fun environment? Join us for the…

First time at the Public Art & Civic Design Conference, or simply want to meet new people in a casual, fun environment? Join us for the Newcomers and New-at-Heart Meet-and-Greet to find a conference buddy, meet rising talent, and get your energy going before the conference kicks off! 

Learning Objectives:

  • Meet new people!
  • Learn more about what the Public Art & Civic Design Conference is, who attends, and explore the schedule of events.
  • Pick up some new ice-breaker exercises to take back home.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Interactive icon Interactive

Looking for a more low-key opportunity to meet some new people and talk about common interests?

Looking for a more low-key opportunity to meet some new people and talk about common interests? Get an early start on the Public Art & Civic Design Conference by joining the Roundtables, where the topics run from serious to absurd to DIY, and you can find new friends without a single ice-breaker! 

Learning Objectives:

  • Meet new people!
  • Connect with other people interested in common topics, learn and share.
  • Mix and mingle at your own pace, and start the Convention with a few new folks to say hi to along the way.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Breakout Session

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Panel Icon Panel

We’ve all heard someone in our community say, “How much did the City pay for that artwork?!” Public art in civic projects often gets the short…

We’ve all heard someone in our community say, “How much did the City pay for that artwork?!” Public art in civic projects often gets the short shrift. There is much competition for those limited resources making it difficult to accommodate the creation and maintenance of public art. Three planners with experience in different geographic regions, community scales, and public art organizations will discuss how to communicate value to decision makers and build community support where public art and civic design intersect. The session will include examples and lessons learned at three phases of a project lifespan – the cultural plan, initial project planning phase, and project evaluation. The discussion will include community engagement to develop support from the public and elected officials. The discussion will also consider different analytical frameworks for “flagship” and “community” public art projects in terms of project goals, evaluation, and community outcomes. The take-away from this session is that planning-based strategies such as partnerships, inclusivity, and context-sensitivity foster project buy-in and convey value.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand a variety of planning-based strategies about context and project type to convey value of public art projects to decision makers and stakeholders.
  • Better understand value-added partnerships and be able to identify potential partners for public artwork creation and implementation to foster community support.
  • Take away tools to set up a successful public art projects with the goals of inclusion, community buy-in, and communicating value.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Panel Icon Panel

Since 2011, the National Endowment for the Arts has supported over 580 local creative placemaking project grants via the Our Town grant program.

Since 2011, the National Endowment for the Arts has supported over 580 local creative placemaking project grants via the Our Town grant program. Our Town supports partnerships between local governments (or federally recognized tribal governments) and nonprofit cultural organizations to strengthen their communities via arts, culture and design activities. This session will feature trends in the field of creative placemaking, reflecting on the critical role that artists and designers have played in galvanizing communities to drive systems change on the local level. The panel will feature the perspectives of two unique local creative placemaking projects, with representation from both the artist/designer and local government partnership.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the unique ways in which artists and designers drive local change
  • Understand what it takes to structure a successful local government/artist partnership
  • Learn about long-term impacts resulting from short-term creative placemaking projects

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Panel Icon Panel

How can an artist’s voice amplify forgotten, overlooked, or marginalized community stories? How can a rigorous artistic practice uncover and…

How can an artist’s voice amplify forgotten, overlooked, or marginalized community stories? How can a rigorous artistic practice uncover and meaningfully manifest collective memories of place and home? How can the public display of community memory raise awareness of historic wrongs, build empathy for marginalized peoples, and instill a greater understanding of shared humanity? In this session, three multidisciplinary artists will discuss intimate and long-term collaborations with community-based organizations in the Pittsburgh region, facilitated by the Office of Public Art, that resulted in public artworks that amplify unheard, underrepresented, or marginalized narratives. Through large-scale, muralistic photo collages, an analog graphic display board, and an immersive theater experience, respectively, these three artists inscribed the stories of their collaborating communities in the public consciousness and expressed the power of art to represent collective experience. In the historically Black neighborhood of the Hill District, artist and multimedia producer Njaimeh Njie collaborated with the Hill House Association to gather oral histories, photographs, and archival materials from dozens of residents, libraries, and archives. Njie created richly layered, large-scale, muralistic photographic installations on public facades of a neighborhood that has faced structural and institutional racism and disinvestment. Her Homecoming: Hill District, USA and companion website centers the voice of the community, authentically reflecting a people’s history of the Hill District. Multidisciplinary visual artist John Peña led recurring story-sharing sessions with the senior residents at the Larimer Consensus Group, who felt their memories were being erased by time and rapid redevelopment. Peña worked with the residents to install a literal platform for their forgotten histories in the form of a call-and-response analog visual display. Titled Larimer Stories, this artwork displays first person memories of this racially and economically diverse neighborhood. Over the course of a year, the text on the displays changed every two weeks, allowing a narrative of the neighborhood to unfold in time and space. Playwright Molly Rice collaborated with newly arrived Afghan women refugees through a two year artist residency with the resettlement program at the Northern Area Multi Service Center. Rice came to understand the deep connection for these women between their memories of home and the tastes and smells of their regional cuisine. With the women, she co-created an immersive theater experience, titled Khūrākī, that combined first-person actor portrayals of the womens’ stories of their home country with food that was prepared onsite by the women themselves and even served to the audience by the women’s children. The project continues to resonate as Rice supports the women in efforts to build entrepreneurship skills and start their own catering business. In order to authentically research, develop, and represent collective memory, each artist underwent an intensive process that involved trust-building, community and stakeholder engagement, and ongoing communication and project management. This process, managed by the Office of Public Art (OPA), placed each artist either in residency or in close collaboration with a partnering community-based organization. Hear from OPA on the development and implementation of these processes and from the artists on both the challenges they faced and the successes they enjoyed. Arts administrators, artists, and creative professionals seeking to create, develop, or learn more about artist-community collaborations are welcome and encouraged to bring questions of their own to this panel-style session. Time will be held at the end of the session for learning from each other and acknowledging the expertise in the room.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and evaluate aspects of critical creative practice that contribute to authentic engagement, relationship- and trust-building, and community buy-in for works of public art.

  • Recognize common themes in process and project management that support meaningful, positive, and productive outcomes for artists, community members, and arts administrators.

  • Understand the artist’s point of view through three firsthand accounts from a playwright, a multimedia producer, and a visual artist about the processes and practices behind the creation of three diverse public artworks that illuminate and center the collective memories of underrepresented and marginalized communities.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Lab icon Lab

Technology-based public artworks are often characterized by having a durational element, such as sound, performance, light, or movement, that…

Technology-based public artworks are often characterized by having a durational element, such as sound, performance, light, or movement, that unfolds to the viewer over time via slide, film, video, software, or the internet. Since these artworks are subject to technical and technological obsolescence, it is often left to the art administrator to identify, acknowledge, and respect the conceptual nature of these works. Presenters will share processes, challenges, lessons learned and successes in adapting and responding to these increasingly common forms of public art. During the second half of the session, the presenters will open up the forum to the audience so they can ask questions of the presenters or share their experiences working with tech-based public art.

Learning Objectives:

  • Articulate the big-picture needs of impending projects, particularly as it relates to the preparation, care, and management of tech-based public artworks.
  • Plan for the various aspects related to the commissioning of a tech-based artwork, such as how to successfully assess materials and document the creative process.
  • Learn how emerging modes of collaboration between artists, conservators, art historians, technical experts and curators can help advance the field.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Breakout Session

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Panel Icon Panel

This session will emphasize how choosing the right fabricator is essential to the successful realization of public artwork, as is knowing the full-…

This session will emphasize how choosing the right fabricator is essential to the successful realization of public artwork, as is knowing the full-range of services fabricators can often provide. Through discussing a range of fabricator examples and public projects, the aim of this panel is to illuminate the many fabrication services artists can take advantage of when applying for, and executing, large-scale public artworks, such as fabrication services that help best steward time, energy and funding, and services that benefit both the well-established and emerging artists, public art agencies, associated project constituents, and the project itself. The advantageous services to be discussed will include project management, installation consultation, technical design assistance and the enhancement of RFP submissions. By locating and then collaborating with full-service fabricators, artists can focus on making art and finding new opportunities for public art commissions while resting in the knowledge that their trusted fabrication partner has their eye on the timeline, budget and other project complexities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the benefits of entrusting a fabricator with total project management. From watching project timelines and budgets to being the “go-to” and innovative problem-solver for unforeseen challenges, entrusting a fabricator with these tasks frees artists to focus on the creative aspects of the project as well look for new work.
  • Learn how artists new to public art can increase their total portfolio on RFP submission by teaming with an experienced fabricator, thereby increasing their chances for securing large commissions, as well as broadening the range of artists public agencies can consider.
  • Learn the benefits of working with fabricators who have deep technical experience. Such fabricators can guide artists on the complexities of large-scale work, thereby helping them understand better both the limitations and possibilities, as well as helping increase perceived manageability of the work.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Interactive icon Interactive

By replacing competition, politics, greed, and maps, with collaboration, art-making, and empathy community engagement becomes inclusive, equitable…

By replacing competition, politics, greed, and maps, with collaboration, art-making, and empathy community engagement becomes inclusive, equitable, and meaningful. Place It! creates a safe space for visual and spatial thinkers, youth, women, non-native English speakers, and other underrepresented communities to express themselves in new ways. By using storytelling, objects, and sensory experiences this method quickly builds consensus to find common values, and solutions through the participants memories, needs, and aspirations. This interactive session will teach participants this method and how it has been applied to develop various projects and plans across the US.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to incorporate Place It! into the municipal urban planning process to develop policies, zoning, develops, and projects that reflect community values and long-term community preservation.
  • Learn how to humanize the technical planning process in order to engage underrepresented communities and tap into their core values to change planning outcomes.
  • Learn how to increase the public’s urban planning capacity, build social cohesion, and encourage self-determination as well.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Panel Icon Panel

Last year news broke that the Chicago Public Library intended to deaccession and send to auction a painting by Kerry James Marshall with proceeds…

Last year news broke that the Chicago Public Library intended to deaccession and send to auction a painting by Kerry James Marshall with proceeds going toward the expansion of a library and establishment of a new public art to support public art projects in underserved communities. Earlier this year the San Francisco Unified School District voted to destroy an important series of murals at a local high school originally commissioned by the U.S. government under a New Deal-era art program and painted by artist Victor Arnautoff. These news headlines have sparked a firestorm of controversy within the art world and are the latest in a wave of public art conundrums that have come under public scrutiny and demonstrates that there is a continuum of opinions when it comes to the applicability of professional standards, especially those concerning stewardship, deaccessioning and disposal. A panel of experts will explain the legal and ethical rationales regarding deaccessioning and disposal, clarify misconceptions, and address current issues in collection stewardship. During the second half of the session the presenters will open up the forum to the audience so they can ask questions of the presenters or share their solutions to similar challenges. The goal for the session is to encourage open dialog and create an environment that empowers public art administrators to find solutions to these challenges.

Learning Objectives:

  • Gain deeper insight about recent controversies and strengthen your ability to assess options for resolving future collections conundrums.
  • Become better able to articulate the ethical arguments for and against deaccessioning and disposal and acknowledge the changing needs of the public, provoking methodologies for future sustainability.
  • Learn that resolutions don’t always come in black and white and that they require creative thinking.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Discussion Icon Discussion

Public Art can be explicitly created to respond to or commemorate a person or place, which is viewed as relevant to a social group as part of their…

Public Art can be explicitly created to respond to or commemorate a person or place, which is viewed as relevant to a social group as part of their remembrance of historic times or cultural heritage. Throughout the 20th century and to the present, public art in America has represented a limited cultural scope that has lacked indigenous perspectives. In this panel, speakers will address the topic within the context of their work with indigenous groups; discuss changing strategies of representation and best practices for respectful outreach and collaboration. During the second half of the session the presenters will open up the forum to the audience so they can ask questions of the presenters or share insights on consultation with indigenous communities. The goal for the session is to encourage open dialog and create an environment that empowers public art administrators to better understand how the past continues to influence contemporary issues, changing demographics and the natural environment, and encourages critical thinking.

Learning Objectives:

  • Sharpen their strategic approach to building a relationship between their agency, staff, and indigenous communities and become better able to dialogue and collaborate with local indigenous communities to increase respect and understanding.
  • Hear lessons learned and frameworks for using indigenous cultural material, and interacting with indigenous communities.
  • Formulate creative programming ideas to foster community engagement, and explore how a “typical” public art process can be expanded to better incorporate external constituents.

Saturday, June 27, 2020

9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Public Art & Civic Design Tours

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Tour icon Public Art & Civic Design Tour

Guided by the personal vision of its founders, Glenstone Museum is a place that seamlessly integrates art, architecture, and landscape into a…

Guided by the personal vision of its founders, Glenstone Museum is a place that seamlessly integrates art, architecture, and landscape into a serene and contemplative environment in a series of refined indoor and outdoor spaces designed to facilitate meaningful encounters. Led by Paul Tukey, Chief Sustainability Officer, Glenstone Museum, this talk and tour will begin and end at Glenstone Museum’s Environmental Center, the organization’s education center, for a review of Glenstone’s sustainable practices. Glenstone’s award-winning architecture has been designed to integrate into the landscape, which is interspersed with artworks, and the entire 300-acre campus is maintained with 100 percent organic, natural protocols. Wear stout walking shoes!

Preparation: All tours will leave from the hotel. Transportation is provided to and from the hotel. Attendees should plan to wear comfortable clothing and footwear. Tours will take place regardless of weather, so dress appropriately. Bring a camera or phone to capture and share your experience.

Learning Objectives:

  • How we can adapt sustainable practices in our own homes and businesses through hands-on presentations and exhibits focusing on some of Glenstone’s efforts, including: organic landscaping, composting recycling, reforestation, management of invasive species , stream restoration and water management
  • Learn environmentally sustainable practices
  • Learn how to implement projects, with specific examples from experts in sustainability practice

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Tour icon Public Art & Civic Design Tour

This tour provides a deep dive into what it takes to develop public art projects transit and transportation projects in Northern Virginia.

This tour provides a deep dive into what it takes to develop public art projects transit and transportation projects in Northern Virginia.

Preparation: All tours will leave from the hotel. Transportation is provided to and from the hotel. Attendees should plan to wear comfortable clothing and footwear. Tours will take place regardless of weather, so dress appropriately. Bring a camera or phone to capture and share your experience.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Tour icon Public Art & Civic Design Tour

This tour will take conference attendees through both a contemporary and historical view of gender and representation in public spaces. We will…

This tour will take conference attendees through both a contemporary and historical view of gender and representation in public spaces. We will tour recent projects and initiatives as well as historical examples. While the tour will explore sites and projects specific to Washington, D.C., it will also take a broader view to encourage participants to think about representation and public space their own cities and towns across America. Projects toured will include the following:

  • The National Museum of Women in the Arts’ (NMWA) New York Avenue Sculpture Project, the only public space in Washington, D.C. dedicated to featuring a changing installation of contemporary works by women artists. This program currently features work by artist Betsabeé Romero and this section of the tour will be led by a representative of NMWA.
  • Artworks by contemporary artists Maren Hassinger and Rania Hassan that are part of a public art initiative along Connecticut Avenue in D.C.’s central business district. These temporary works were created through a partnership with the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative and the Golden Triangle BID. This portion of the tour will be led by Dorothy Moss, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery and Karyn Miller, the Golden Triangle BID’s curator.
  • A tour of the Joan of Arc statue in Meridian Hill Park which is often cited as one of the just five statues depicting women in Washington, D.C. This segment of the tour will be led by Nora Heimann, an art historian and Joan of Arc scholar.

Preparation: All tours will leave from the hotel. Transportation is provided to and from the hotel. Attendees should plan to wear comfortable clothing and footwear. Tours will take place regardless of weather, so dress appropriately. Bring a camera or phone to capture and share your experience.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Tour icon Public Art & Civic Design Tour

Over the last ten years, cultural institutions across the US have been re-thinking the traditional visitor experience, and finding new ways to…

Over the last ten years, cultural institutions across the US have been re-thinking the traditional visitor experience, and finding new ways to engage audiences as cultural participants, not passive consumers. Public art, which once implied monumental, permanent works such as statues and murals, today can also mean performance, video, temporary installations, and more. At a time when cultural institutions are rethinking inclusion, public libraries offer a powerful opportunity to lower barriers to access. In this tour, participants will explore the public art program at DC Public Library by exploring a select number of neighborhood libraries, including permanent outdoor and indoor works and live programming. To start of the tour, Library leadership will preview plans for public art in the central Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, and join in curatorial conversation about the role of art in public libraries today.

Preparation: All tours will leave from the hotel. Transportation is provided to and from the hotel. Attendees should plan to wear comfortable clothing and footwear. Tours will take place regardless of weather, so dress appropriately. Bring a camera or phone to capture and share your experience.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Tour icon Public Art & Civic Design Tour

D.C. has a lot to offer in the ways of sight-seeing. During this tour, attendees will be provided with instructions for a self-guided tour that…

D.C. has a lot to offer in the ways of sight-seeing. During this tour, attendees will be provided with instructions for a self-guided tour that will take them to see some of the arts and cultural sites around the area.

Preparation: All tours will leave from the hotel. Transportation is provided to and from the hotel. Attendees should plan to wear comfortable clothing and footwear. Tours will take place regardless of weather, so dress appropriately. Bring a camera or phone to capture and share your experience.

2:15 PM - 3:45 PM

Breakout Session

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Panel Icon Panel

The public sculpture revival from the late 1960s to the early 1990s saw an increase in the siting of permanent public sculptures that reflected the…

The public sculpture revival from the late 1960s to the early 1990s saw an increase in the siting of permanent public sculptures that reflected the taste for abstract modernism. In the thirty years since the end of that revival, changes in policies, ideologies, sites, and artistic styles have impacted these artworks. The derogatory terms used to describe modern public sculpture – ‘plop art,’ ‘plaza art,’ ‘plunk art’ – highlight the fact that these aging sculptures are now sited in a postmodern public realm that prizes different characteristics in public art such as physical or social engagement. This panel will discuss the challenges of aging permanent public sculpture, present cases studies, and brainstorm solutions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand a basic problem: aging, static public sculptures are ubiquitous, but could be ripe for a reawakening.
  • Grasp the paradigm shift in public art from one espousing Art in Public Places, to one espousing engagement-centric public art.
  • Be exposed to two case studies of static aging public sculptures, their commission history, and a range of intervention options that could work to reawaken these sculptures for the public.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Panel Icon Panel

Cities such as Minneapolis and Seattle are using Cultural District policies as anti-gentrification, economic development strategies.

Cities such as Minneapolis and Seattle are using Cultural District policies as anti-gentrification, economic development strategies. Aimed at protecting the racial diversity and uplifting the cultural identity of the city areas where a significant portion of the population is comprised of people of color, Indigenous people, and/or immigrant (POCII) communities, these policies center arts and culture as a tool of empowerment for underrepresented communities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examples of cities that have put in place Cultural District policies aimed at stabilizing communities that are most vulnerable to displacement; and share research on comparative models in cities and Cultural District activation tools whose goals are racial equity
  • Provide examples of the concrete steps taken by cities to integrate a suite of strategies that work to stabilize communities in designated Cultural Districts; and highlight the roles that city and state arts and culture agencies have taken and their collaboration with community activists
  • Show case studies from the Cities of Minneapolis and Seattle as a model for this work

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Panel Icon Panel

The session will provide an overview of the technical and logistical components of installing public art as well as the nuances of building…

The session will provide an overview of the technical and logistical components of installing public art as well as the nuances of building relationships and collaborating with fabricators, contractors, and architects. The technical and logistical overview is comprised of site coordination, scheduling, and information pertaining to code enforcement and a variety of specific state statutes. Relationship building and collaborating components will include an overview of common stakeholder/artist responsibilities and construction schedules.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn “need to know, but rarely discussed” information regarding the detailed, technical aspects of installing public art projects.
  • Learn strategies for developing and/or improving relationships with contractors, fabricators, installers and municipal employees.
  • Receive case analyses from artists, fabricators and arts administrators regarding specific public art installation dilemmas and their respective resolutions.

Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Discussion Icon Discussion

During these challenging times, how are artists creating welcoming and engaging experiences that explore the complex stories of border communities…

During these challenging times, how are artists creating welcoming and engaging experiences that explore the complex stories of border communities? It’s easy to forget that the U.S.-Mexican border is a real place where people live, work and cross on a regular basis. Artistic interventions and collaborations are powerful tools with which to engage communities impacted by bi-national transition and identity in the US–Mexico border regions. Join this impassioned panel to learn about creative ways that artists and arts administrators are working with border populations and their approaches to creation and engagement. During the second half of the session the presenters will open up the forum to the audience so they can ask questions of the presenters or share their community-focused work. The goal for the session is to encourage open dialog and create a platforms that foster empathy through artistic practice and engagement.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the initiatives and practices of artists that are exploring the experiences of U.S Mexico border populations.
  • Hear lessons learned and frameworks for this community-focused work, and build upon these ideas with best practices from your own experiences.
  • Discuss public art as a catalyst for discussing contemporary concerns and the impact it can have in building awareness and empathy.

Sunday, June 28, 2020

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Breakout Session

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Panel Icon Panel

Climate change has shifted into climate crisis. We are now increasingly aware that the actions taken thus far are not working. Weather extremes…

Climate change has shifted into climate crisis. We are now increasingly aware that the actions taken thus far are not working. Weather extremes are more common. Legislature is changing. Activists are growing in number. Many communities are launching new rounds of climate action planning and mobilization. It is a reality we can no longer escape, and systemic-level changes need to happen now. And although we do not have immediate solutions, we must act with courage and compassion. Equity must be at the center of our climate crisis action – systemic injustice and institutionalized racism have caused people of color to bear the greatest cost of climate change. The role of artists and cultural leaders is to tell this story by going to the heart of the issues at hand. Efforts focused on the more tangible and tactical factors—installing more solar, putting in more bike lanes, even managing land to capture more carbon -- are important parts of the solution, but we need to look deeper into our cultural narrative. This panel discussion is a deeper dive into the experiences of three artists invited to work with communities to make change. The discussion will specifically focus communal conversations and outcomes illustrated through public artworks, and is not a conversation about individual projects and experience, but a collective and collaborative one. Proposed participating artists include: Matthew Mazzotta, Benny Starr, Mary Mattingly, Grandmother Nancy, and Jason Bregman – Michael Singer Studios. The panel would be faciliated by Mandy Vink, AFTA PAN Council member.

Learning Objectives:

  • Hear unexpected and encouraging perspectives in climate commitment and climate crisis conversations, specifically how artists are conversing with, engaging in, and responding to this critical topic.
  • Engage in conversations about how climate change impacts us ALL and howartists and cultural leaders can be at the forefront of a systemic and equitable change, which considers how positive changes will only be successful if they equally impact us ALL.
  • Have access to practices that push traditional boundaries of public art in response to climate commitment.

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Discussion Icon Discussion

In this hands-on workshop, a seasoned evaluator demystifies the process of planning for evaluation. Participants will gain concrete insights from…

In this hands-on workshop, a seasoned evaluator demystifies the process of planning for evaluation. Participants will gain concrete insights from two recent and very different evaluation planning efforts. Through small group work, participants will also swap successes and challenges with their own evaluation planning efforts. Attendees will leave with know-how to get them off on the right foot with understanding what difference their efforts make, how, and why.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine two very different examples of real-world evaluation planning efforts.
  • Learn what a theory of change is, how to translate their goals into researchable evaluation questions, and common pitfalls of data collection to avoid.
  • Discuss the concept of equitable evaluation and reflection questions and resources to deepen that work.

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Lab icon Lab

Using the new “Work. Shouldn’t. Suck.” organizational design game, this interactive session dives into “The How” of creating diverse, inclusive,…

Using the new “Work. Shouldn’t. Suck.” organizational design game, this interactive session dives into “The How” of creating diverse, inclusive, and/or equitable workplaces where people can do their best work and thrive. Part presentation, part game play, participants will go on a creative world building adventure to explore practical, people-centric approaches, concepts, and frameworks that you can start using immediately your own organization and life. Discussions will delve into workplace components like transparency, alignment, and accountability; resilience & self-care; hiring and retention, and how these components can come together to create thriving teams and organizations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Dissect the monolith of "organizational culture" to identify its component parts.
  • Imagine team cultures that support the type of place your organization strives to be.
  • Walk away with practical ideas, tools, and frameworks that can be used immediately to help you in your own team crafting.

Annual Convention and Public Art & Civic Design Conference
Discussion Icon Discussion

As the local arts and public art fields continues to grow, more and more artists are engaged in communities and across non-arts sectors.

As the local arts and public art fields continues to grow, more and more artists are engaged in communities and across non-arts sectors. In this session attendees will hear from experts on the best ways to advocate for artists rights when incorporating artists into community development projects.