Schedule

Wednesday, May 18, 2022

4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Listening to the Field: Cultural Asset Mapping & Identification
Interactive icon Interactive

Join Americans for the Arts and rootoftwo for a meet-up and facilitated discussion that focuses on the opportunities, challenges and changed realities of cultural asset mapping practices. We are interested in how participatory cultural asset mapping approaches can be defined and led through an intentional cultural equity lens that centers the work and experiences of BIPOC culture-bearers, artists and organizations. This session is part of a year-long process co-designed and led by rootoftwo and Americans for the Arts to create a comprehensive set of tools, resources, and rubrics that help communities to identify cultural assets and understand the health of those assets. It will be one approach for local arts leaders to identify their unique cultural and artistic community assets: to see gaps, build strong and authentic partnerships, focus on frontline communities, and be part of community development towards a just transition for creative workers to have the opportunity for self-determination.

Cezanne Charles, Partner, rootoftwo
John Marshall, Partner, rootoftwo

Location: Executive Room

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Newcomers and New-At-Heart Meet-and-Greet

Welcome back, or welcome for the first time—whether you’re a first-time attendee at the Annual Convention or a seasoned veteran, we all may feel a bit like a newcomer after a few years away. This low-stress re-entry session is to help make sure you’ve got some folks to experience the next few days with; to answer your burning questions about how this whole thing is going to work; and to orient you to the space, the sessions, and the host city. All are welcome and encouraged to attend! 

Jerelle Jenkins, Sr. Coordinator, Equitable Workforce Development, Americans for the Arts 
Marissa Shadburn, Sr. Coordinator, Creative Community Advancement, Americans for the Arts

Location: Empire Ballroom 

6:00 PM - 6:30 PM

United Arts Fund and LAA Grant Makers Meet-and-Greet
A paper with a star coming out of an envelope Reception

Join fellow United Arts Fund and local arts agency Grantmakers for an informal gathering to connect, reconvene, and celebrate being together at this year’s Annual Convention. This short reception will offer time to talk shop, or just enjoy each other’s company. United Arts Funds are local arts agencies who raise and distribute general operating support for their broad community of arts organizations. Any United Arts Fund staff member, or local arts agency leader whose organization provides grants is welcome! It will take place to the start of the Welcome Reception, so stop by before heading to the bigger party!

Location: Robert's Restaurant Private Dining Room

6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Welcome Reception

Let’s Come Together in the Open Air
A paper with a star coming out of an envelope Reception

Let’s officially start things off with a welcome reception featuring music, food and drink, and the beautiful surroundings of Omni Shoreham Hotel’s gardens overlooking Rock Creek Park (weather permitting). Stay for as long as you want, and if you’re inclined, explore Washington, D.C. as the sun sets! 

Location: Empire Patio (entrance through Robert's Restaurant) (weather permitting)

Rain location: Empire Ballroom

Thursday, May 19, 2022

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Breakfast
A fork and spoon inside a circle Meal

Breakfast will be offered with flexibility to allow you to eat with colleagues, head back to your room, eat outside, or whatever other arrangement is best for you! 

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Morning Mainstage

Arts and Culture at the Crossroads
A stage with spotlights shining down from the rafters Mainstage

What does it mean to come together, acknowledge history, imagine the future, and carry forward together? Find out in our opening keynote, featuring remarks from author and playwright R. Eric Thomas and Congresswoman and arts champion Teresa Leger Fernández. In addition, explore the cultural history of Washington, D.C., from its Indigenous peoples to its long African-American legacy, see the debut of an exciting new version of the Arts + Social Impact Explorer, and hear from Americans for the Arts President and CEO Nolen V. Bivens about the principles guiding Americans for the Arts forward and the transformative change the field is undergoing. All of that opened by a rousing welcome from D.C.'s own Crush Funk Brass!

R. Eric Thomas, author, biographer, playwright, and columnist
Congresswoman Teresa Leger Fernández, Representative (D-New Mexico), U.S. House of Representatives (pre-recorded remarks)
Nolen V. Bivens, President and CEO, Americans for the Arts
Debra Garcia y Griego, Cabinet Secretary New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs
Andrea Noble, Executive Director, Alaska State Council on the Arts
Heran Sereke-Brhan, Executive Director, DC Commission on the Arts and the Humanities
Clay Lord, Vice President of Strategic Impact, Americans for the Arts

Ruby Lopez Harper, Vice President of Equity and Local Arts Engagement, Americans for the Arts

Artistic Performance by Crush Funk Brass

Location: Regency Ballroom

10:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Networking and Breathing Break
An icon of a coffee mug with a clock in front of it Break

Connect with colleagues, take a break, take a walk—this is your time for a breather!

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Breakout Sessions

NEA Grants: Overview of Opportunities
Panel Icon Panel

Join us to learn more about funding programs available through the National Endowment for the Arts. We’ll introduce the basics of National Endowment for the Arts grant programs, the application process, and review criteria, including answers to the most frequently asked questions.

Michael Orlove, Director of State, Regional, & Local Partnerships, National Endowment for the Arts
Lara Holman Garritano, State and Regional Specialist, National Endowment for the Arts

Location: Ambassador Ballroom

Public Art and Its Impact on Community Recovery and Regeneration
Panel Icon Panel

Recovery from the global pandemic will demand ambitious strategies and tactics. No one alive has experienced what we are all going through. Beyond mitigating the immediate impacts of the pandemic, the cities' response will also determine social and economic outcomes for years to come. In this sense, the characteristics of response strategies now, open up possibilities for very different futures. What is the role of public art in the opportunity for recovery and regeneration? Discover how cities large and small are using public art as a catalyst to jump-start economies and inspire communities. Learn about the impact of public art projects and how cities use art and creativity to recover, regenerate and build momentum for the future.

Nick Anderson, Senior Associate, Creative Strategies, UAP (Urban Art Projects)
Umbereen Inayet, Programming Supervisor, City of Toronto Economic Development, Arts & Culture Division
Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg, Artist/Owner, Flash Sideways Studio
Tamsin Dillon, Executive Director, Socrates Sculpture Park

Location: Empire Ballroom

Roundtables: Research and Evaluation // Social Impact & Public Value
Discussion Icon Roundtable

Join this session to discuss projects, ideas, and ongoing efforts to improve and highlight the social impact of the arts and the perceived value of the arts by the public, as well as other explorations of the latest research, evaluation, and learning trends and projects.

Location: Diplomat Ballroom

Roundtable Presentations:
  • TABLE 1: Art To The People: How to Help Our Communities Heal Via Creative Wellness Practices
    Presented by:
    Zoë Lintzeris, Visual Artist, Arts in Health Specialist and Consultant, N/A (Self)

    Learn how the intersection of art, wellness and psychology is reshaping our economies and societies. In understanding how to create, develop and/or sustain a tailored arts and wellness initiative or program for our communities, attendees will walk away with an understanding of how the ritual of meditation, art-making and light movement can significantly improve overall well-being, especially in marginalized and disenfranchised areas.

  • TABLE 2: Failing Forward: Using Visual Art to Promote a Growth Mindset
    Presented by:
    Brittany Arnold, Teen & Family Coordinator, Scottsdale Arts

    We've all heard it: fail forward! But how does failing apply to social emotional learning? Explore how visual arts can connect to SEL competencies by examining impactful aspects of existing teen art programs at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMoCA). Using the collection, participants will leave with practical, yet creative ideas, that you can immediately be implemented into any classroom or program to inspire a growth mindset. For this session, you will need to be prepared to look at art and use cell phone images to participate in a discussion that will hopefully empower you to use visual art to embrace a “fail forward” mentality.

  • TABLE 3: Measuring The Collective Impact of Community-driven Public Art
    Presented by:
    Jing Huang, MS/MPH candidate, Tufts University

    In Boston Chinatown’s Hudson Street, residents were displaced by a highway in the 1950’s and since then, continuous gentrification. How can art invite long-time and new residents to honor the past while re-imagining a more just future? How can art build empathy and power so residents can shape their cultural and physical landscapes? Hudson Street Stoop (HSS) is an 18-month rotating public art initiative, presented by the Asian Community Development Corporation (ACDC), to create a modern-day stoop where Chinatown residents can connect across racial, socioeconomic, and generational backgrounds while centering the experiences of those most at risk of displacement. Together, an ACDC staff, a HSS artist or community member, and a representative of the culturally-informed evaluation team from Tufts University will present ACDC’s creative placekeeping strategy, the community-driven artwork development of the inaugural HSS installation Storytell & Sway, and the measurable impact this installation has had on the neighborhood.

  • TABLE 4: Creating Resilient Communities Begins with the Arts
    Presented by:
    Janet Newcomb, Executive Director, National Coalition for Arts' Preparedness & Emergency Response (NCAPER)

    “Art sparks conversation and connects communities. In the wake of a disaster, the arts can be called upon to offer solace, comfort, and connection to help communities heal.” Although this was written by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), not an arts organization, FEMA understands that it needs a proactive arts sector to engage parts of the community that they do not reach. This is a call to action for arts organizations and funders to advocate for and engage in changing our federal disaster response system to include all victims and communities suffering from devastation and to help them mitigate future damage. The facilitator will present examples of how national arts preparedness organizations have collaborated with artists and local, regional, and national arts agencies to create community mitigation projects that reduce risk and promote community resilience; grow communities’ readiness by inspiring diverse voices; and build trust and relationships between emergency management and the creative sector.

  • TABLE 5: Impacts of Arts Education: How Do We Know It Matters?
    Presented by:
    Ruth Mercado-Zizzo, Vice President, Programs and Equity, EdVestors

    In this roundtable, participants will discuss findings from a recently released research study from EdVestors, "The Arts Advantage: Impacts of Arts Education on Boston Students" that examines the impacts of arts access on Boston students and its positive effects on student and family engagement. This longitudinal research study was conducted by Dr. Daniel Bowen (Texas A&M University) and Dr. Brian Kisida (University of Missouri), who have a track record in conducting influential arts education research studies. The study encompasses an analysis of eleven years of arts education data and district data regarding student engagement, school climate, and traditional academic outcomes to examine arts educational impacts for students. Participants will discuss how this research and analysis may connect to their practice, their organization or school, and their ability to advocate for the field.

  • TABLE 6: Comparing the Effectiveness of Online vs. In-Person Arts Education
    Presented by:
    Andrew R. Olah, Statistician and Research Consultant, The Junkin Group, LLC

    The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic drove community arts engagement to virtual settings, and thus this roundtable seeks to demonstrate the value of online arts education. Using monitoring and evaluation data collected since 2019, we compared the effectiveness of in-person and online administration of established community arts programming tailored to U.S. military populations (Armed Services Arts Partnership [ASAP]) which successfully converted from in-person to online administration at the pandemic’s onset. Looking at outcomes pertaining to participants’ skill development, well-being, and functions of their arts engagement (self-development, health-enhancement, and community-building), these analyses reveal the ways in which online administration has equivocal outcomes as in-person administration, as well as the ways in which online administration falls short. Based on participant feedback, we further provide best tips for administering arts education in an online Zoom-based environment to maximize outcomes and engagement.

  • TABLE 7: Public Art on a Shoestring Budget
    Presented by:
    Brendan Smith, Arts and Humanities Coordinator, City of Takoma Park, MD

    Even a small public art budget can have a big impact! You can design and implement many creative public art projects on a shoestring budget which engage the public, support the livelihoods of local artists, and enliven public spaces in your community. Brendan Smith is the arts and humanities coordinator for the City of Takoma Park in Maryland where he organizes a wide range of low-budget public art projects on a part-time schedule with a part-time intern. Public art can (and should) extend beyond the traditional model of painting more murals to include interactive and creative placemaking endeavors. Smith has designed innovative public art projects and adapted projects tried elsewhere to support Takoma Park’s reputation as an arts-friendly city. In one memorable project, a 17-foot-tall crocheted octopus landed atop Takoma Park's downtown clock tower where it lived for 6 months before a pack of preschoolers carted it away during the “Great Octoshedopus Parade.”

  • TABLE 8: Cultural Districts: Civic Engagement, Social Infrastructure, and Third Spaces
    Presented by:
    Hsin-Ching Wu, Assistant Professor, College of Charleston

    Cities and towns around the world have instituted cultural districts for various purposes based on the understanding that arts and culture offer instrumental benefits to their communities, such as revitalizing the local economy, improving quality of life, attracting visitors and new residents. Given the increased polarization of US society, it is vital to go beyond traditional economic development arguments and identify and explore the full range of impacts Cultural Districts produce, and how they are sustained. This research explores the role of cultural districts play in improving social infrastructure, fostering civic engagement, and increasing social capital. We examined the goals and objectives contained in the grant proposals submitted to the Massachusetts Cultural Council for the 51 state-designated Cultural Districts in Massachusetts from 2015 to 2021. Based on our findings, we offer recommendations for leveraging existing community development practices centered on arts and culture activities to facilitate increased civic engagement.

  • TABLE 9: Arts-based Social Mobility: Exploring Cultural Capital in Charlotte, NC
    Presented by:
    Meg Whalen, Director of Communications & External Relations, UNC Charlotte College of Arts + Architecture

    This Roundtable presentation will introduce preliminary results from the project, “Arts-based social mobility: Exploring cultural capital in Charlotte, NC,” funded by a Research Grant in the Arts from the National Endowment for the Arts and carried out by an interdisciplinary team from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. A variety of artists and arts organizations in Charlotte create work and offer programs with the explicit goal of positive social impact. Many such activities aspire to increase the cultural capital of participants through arts education, community-based cultural events, creative placemaking, and other types of arts-based experiences. Based on semi-structured interviews, this research explores how local artists and organizations conceptualize and assess the social impact of the arts, what motivates participation in those activities, and how both providers and participants describe those experiences. The project was developed in response to a city/county task force report addressing low economic mobility in Charlotte.

  • TABLE 10: ¡Looking Bilingüe! The Power & Permanence of Storytelling in the Latiné Community
    Presented by:
    Jade Cintrón Báez, Founder, Artistic Director & Host, ¡Looking Bilingüe!

    Latinx/és: why should we tell our story, what does that look like and how can we create a permanent space for them through the arts? In this roundtable, we discuss storytelling as an artform, a tool and form of expression as seen through the work of ¡Looking Bilingüe!, a storytelling series empowering the multiculturalism and multilingualism of the Latinx/é community. We will examine why and how storytelling should be the Latinx/é community’s archival method: a living, breathing, and growing collection of stories that bring to the forefront and prevent the erasure of our Black and Indigenous roots, while acknowledging the history of storytelling in that very ancestry. Understanding our lived experience of being ni de aquí, ni de allá or “neither from here nor from there”, we will explore how the validity of Latinx/é stories can differ or be challenged within their own communities as well as outside of them.

  • TABLE 11: Everyone's Welcome: Creating Mission Statements That Reflect Community Values
    Presented by:
    Andrew Brown, Admissions Counselor, University of Indianapolis

    This research aims to determine how U.S. Orchestras could incorporate Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in their mission statements to combat issues of social inequity both within their organization and within their surrounding communities. An analysis of literature centered around mission statements and CSR revealed a two-pronged approach to current orchestral engagement: external outreach and internal regulation. External outreach represents orchestra-to-community strategies (i.e. community concerts). Internal regulation differs in that orchestras design policies and procedures within the business model to guarantee organizational diversity. (e.g. multicultural fellowships.) 97 active mission statements and community engagement programs were analyzed using Frances Bowen’s “Continuum of Community Engagement” to reveal that traditional engagement has formed a ‘pipeline’ of transactional and transitional engagement, but fails to create transformational engagement.  The author of this paper proposes a new model of engagement for U.S. orchestras based off on Bowen’s CSR model: “The Sonata-Allegro Methods of Engagement.” (S.A.M.E.)
     

  • TABLE 12: The Funding Gaps COVID-19 is Exposing
    Presented by:
    Gregory Burbidge, Research Manager, Calgary Arts Development

    This roundtable will cover what we learned as funders through a series of surveys in 2020 and 2021 for organizations and individuals about the current living and working conditions in the arts. Most importantly, we will discuss how we can respond as funders to what we’ve learned. Like many funders we immediately heard many community needs for support early in the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic unveiled massive gaps in how the arts community operates. Issues like artists agreements occurring over text instead of formal agreements meant they were ineligible for many forms of support, often exacerbated by equity related issues.

  • TABLE 13: Share Your Thoughts with the Americans for the Arts Strategic Realignment Consultants
    Presented by:
    Members of Arts Consulting Group

    Take this opportunity to join an intimate conversation with Arts Consulting Group, one of the teams working on Americans for the Arts' Strategic Realignment Process. Bring whatever thoughts you have to share!
     

  • 12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

    Lunch
    A fork and spoon inside a circle Meal

    Lunch will be offered with flexibility to allow you to eat with colleagues, head back to your room, eat outside, or whatever other arrangement is best for you!

    1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

    Midday Mainstage

    Public Art and Civic Design in a Transforming Country
    A stage with spotlights shining down from the rafters Mainstage

    After lunch, come together in a midday general session and keynote presentation featuring the 2022 Jorge and Darlene Pérez Prize for Public Art and Civic Design winner in dialogue with well-known researcher and creative placemaking expert Juanita Hardy. During this session, we will also celebrate some of our 2022 Leadership Award winners. This session will be opened with a special poetry set given by former D.C. Youth Poet Laureate Marjan Naderi!

    Justin Chapman, Director, Skanska USA
    Jorge and Darlene Pérez, founders, 
    The Jorge M. Pérez Family Foundation (pre-recorded remarks)
    Patricia Walsh, Director, Creative Community Advancement, Americans for the Arts

    Artistic performance by Marjan Naderi and Josh Schwarz

    Location: Regency Ballroom

    2:00 PM - 2:30 PM

    Networking and Breathing Break
    An icon of a coffee mug with a clock in front of it Break

    Connect with colleagues, take a break, take a walk—this is your time for a breather!

    2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

    Breakout Sessions

    Research Round-Up
    Panel Icon Panel

    This annual tradition is an opportunity for attendees to see lightning-fast summaries about some of the best and most relevant arts research produced during the past year. Meet the researchers and take the first step in learning how to apply their work in your community. Lightning-fast presentations will include research on COVID-19’s impact on audiences, artists, and funding, as well as data on the impact of local arts agencies, new economic information from the NEA, and more!

    Randy Cohen, Vice President of Research, Americans for the Arts
    Sunil Iyengar, Director, Office of Research & Analysis, National Endowment for the Arts
    Jill Sonke, Director, Center for the Arts in Medicine, University of Florida College of the Arts
    Zannie Voss, Director, SMU DataArts
    David Andersson, Arts Team, Bloomberg Associates
    Steven Wolff, Principal, AMS Planning & Research

    Location: Ambassador Ballroom

    Transforming Cultural Impact through Social Innovation
    Panel Icon Panel

    The year 2020 was marked by a flurry of new and renewed commitments to social justice across organizations in the cultural sector. Institutions of all sizes took an interest in engaging new communities with a focus on people from Black communities, Indigenous communities, and other communities of color. Subsequently, those working across the sector have found themselves lacking the tools, systems, and understanding necessary to achieve the goals of engagement and impact. A new, more equitable and innovative approach to cultural impact is needed. A social innovation mindset and practice can support institutions looking to grow and sustain an authentic commitment to community. This session offers a tangible framework that sets the stage for active listening, systems interventions, intentionality, and impact measurement.

    Dr. Karisa Antonio, Director of Social Innovation, Detroit Symphony Orchestra
    Claudie Mabry, Director of Social Innovation, Kaufman Music Center

    Location: Empire Ballroom

    Roundtables: Advocacy, Policy, and Civic Engagement // Arts Education & Lifelong Learning
    Discussion Icon Roundtable

    Engage in intimate dialogue with field members doing innovative work on the fronts of advocacy, policy, and civic engagement, as well as discussions on arts education and lifelong learning.

    Location: Diplomat Ballroom

    Roundtable Presentations:
  • TABLE 1: Case Study in Cultural Asset Mapping: Nos Vemos/We See Us
    Presented by:
    Holly Hampton, Senior Manager, Transportation Planning, Metro Art, LA Metro

    Los Angeles County is in the midst of a mobility transformation as Metro delivers the largest transportation building program in North America. Since its inception, Metro Art has engaged in community-driven place-based research resulting in arts and cultural resources that influence planning for public transportation art programs. Our presentation will look at Metro Art tailored approaches to broadening community engagement through deep, long-term community investment from early project planning through construction and beyond. We will share a recent project funded through the Government Alliance on Race and Equity and Race Forward, Nos Vemos/We See Us, to stimulate knowledge-sharing about community-engaged cultural asset mapping strategies. Through Nos Vemos/We See Us, Metro Art commissioned four Southeast Los Angeles-based artists to lead public engagement activities that reveal what makes their neighborhoods special. Participants will learn and discuss best practices and lessons learned related to project development, creative outreach, and arts-led community engagement.
     

  • TABLE 2: Impacts of Arts Education: How Do We Know It Matters?
    Presented by:
    Ruth Mercado-Zizzo, Vice President, Programs and Equity, EdVestors

    In this roundtable, participants will discuss findings from a recently released research study from EdVestors, "The Arts Advantage: Impacts of Arts Education on Boston Students" that examines the impacts of arts access on Boston students and its positive effects on student and family engagement. This longitudinal research study was conducted by Dr. Daniel Bowen (Texas A&M University) and Dr. Brian Kisida (University of Missouri), who have a track record in conducting influential arts education research studies. The study encompasses an analysis of eleven years of arts education data and district data regarding student engagement, school climate, and traditional academic outcomes to examine arts educational impacts for students. Participants will discuss how this research and analysis may connect to their practice, their organization or school, and their ability to advocate for the field.
     

  • TABLE 3: Comparing the Effectiveness of Online vs. In-Person Arts Education
    Presented by:
    Andrew R. Olah, Statistician and Research Consultant, The Junkin Group, LLC

    The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic drove community arts engagement to virtual settings, and thus this roundtable seeks to demonstrate the value of online arts education. Using monitoring and evaluation data collected since 2019, we compared the effectiveness of in-person and online administration of established community arts programming tailored to U.S. military populations (Armed Services Arts Partnership [ASAP]) which successfully converted from in-person to online administration at the pandemic’s onset. Looking at outcomes pertaining to participants’ skill development, well-being, and functions of their arts engagement (self-development, health-enhancement, and community-building), these analyses reveal the ways in which online administration has equivocal outcomes as in-person administration, as well as the ways in which online administration falls short. Based on participant feedback, we further provide best tips for administering arts education in an online Zoom-based environment to maximize outcomes and engagement.
     

  • TABLE 4: Making Change While Making a Living
    Presented by:
    Elizabeth Stookey-Sunde, Co-Founder/Executive Director, Music to Life

    "Our country is home to a multitude of musicians, and the majority work independently. They are self-made entrepreneurs with a robust online presence, intimate connections with fans, and grassroots engagement with their local communities. Perfectly positioned changemakers, indeed, many of these artists also have innovative ideas for music-driven programs that tackle pressing issues. Still, their concepts remain largely untapped given limited training, strategic connections, and resources. 

    Join Music to Life as we discuss the challenges and successes of today’s Activist Musicians who are bringing about innovative social change to their communities and how this is helping provide a needed economic jump-start and revitalization effort among musicians."
     

  • TABLE 5: Youth, Adult, & Senior Arts Program Development for Parks and Recreation Departments
    Presented by:
    Rebecca Pate, Recreation and Arts Specialist, City of Manchester

    Integrating arts programming for all ages into Parks and Recreation programming can be a beneficial and worthwhile experience for artists, and communities alike. Parks and Recreation departments are trusted community sources for programming and activities. Utilizing the resources and reach of P & R Departments can expand the quality and quantity of creative offerings. In this roundtable we will discuss how to communicate with your local P & R department as an artist and or as an administrator, and how to investigate the interest of the community so programs that are desired are offered.
     

  • TABLE 6: Preparing Students to Develop and Manage Educational Programs for Arts Organizations
    Presented by:
    Joshua Ritter, Lecturer/Theatre Manager, UNC Greensboro

    There is a need for a new pedagogy integrating arts management, entrepreneurship, and education. Education directors working for arts organizations have a variety of backgrounds and specializations. Education director effectiveness can be optimized with a broad understanding of arts management, entrepreneurship, and education.  Education directors should be aware of the latest industry best practices related to the educational mission of their arts organization and the needs of the community they serve. Lecturer/Theatre Manager, Josh Ritter, has pioneered this new pedagogy through experimental classes at UNC Greensboro. Josh will share his curriculum development related to this new approach to preparing students to develop and manage educational programs for arts organizations.
     

  • TABLE 7: Linking Arts and Language Learning for Multilingual Learners
    Presented by:
    Erin Loughran, Associate Director of ELL Programs, ArtsConnection

    ArtsConnection is excited to share our new Developing English Language Literacy and the Arts (DELLTA) website. This website shares research, resources, strategies and tools for teaching artists, classroom educators and arts professionals created in our DELLTA dance, theater and visual arts programs over the past 15 years. We’ll delve into: How can you support all students to work and think like artists - including multilingual learners?  What strategies support ownership of learning and nurture student voice? How can a digital portfolio process document and assess student learning for both teachers and students?  Learn specific strategies and discover new instructional tools to use with students in creating artwork, offering and receiving feedback or reflecting on work.
     

  • TABLE 8: Connected Arts Networks: Leveraging Arts Learning Communities
    Presented by:
    Amy Appleton, Connected Arts Networks Project Director, National Art Education Association

    The National Art Education Association (NAEA) is launching Connected Arts Networks, a federally funded five-year project to create nationwide Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) with educators in visual arts, music, theater, dance and digital media. Arts educators in these PLCs will work with Teacher Leaders to build their capacity to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and social-emotional learning in their arts instruction. NAEA views these content areas as the most pressing for arts educators at this moment in time and believes that we can positively impact students by creating opportunities for arts educators to learn from and with each other. This Roundtable Discussion will provide participants with information about the project and how they can get involved in PLCs to further their own education and collaborate with arts leaders across the country.
     

  • TABLE 9: Arts Advocacy for Local Elections
    Presented by:
    Daniel Fitzmaurice, Chief of Staff, Americans for the Arts

    Local elections receive far less attention than national or statewide elections, resulting in significantly lower voter turnout. However, locally elected officials have significant influence in their communities. To counteract this trend, the Arts Council of Greater New Haven has organized an artist-led campaign annually called Create the Vote. Particularly during these so-called "quiet" election cycles, these initiatives to connect residents, artists, and mayoral candidates have been creative, original, and powerful. This roundtable will explore the tactics during these campaigns, the outcomes for participants in this work, and some examples to adapt to your communities.
     

  • TABLE 10: The Funding Gaps COVID-19 is Exposing
    Presented by:
    Gregory Burbidge, Research Manager, Calgary Arts Development

    This roundtable will cover what we learned as funders through a series of surveys in 2020 and 2021 for organizations and individuals about the current living and working conditions in the arts. Most importantly, we will discuss how we can respond as funders to what we’ve learned. Like many funders we immediately heard many community needs for support early in the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic unveiled massive gaps in how the arts community operates. Issues like artists agreements occurring over text instead of formal agreements meant they were ineligible for many forms of support, often exacerbated by equity related issues.
     

  • TABLE 11: Share Your Thoughts with the Americans for the Arts Strategic Realignment Consultants
    Presented by:
    Members of Arts Consulting Group

    Take this opportunity to join an intimate conversation with Arts Consulting Group, one of the teams working on Americans for the Arts' Strategic Realignment Process. Bring whatever thoughts you have to share!
     

  • 3:45 PM - 4:15 PM

    Networking and Breathing Break
    An icon of a coffee mug with a clock in front of it Break

    Connect with colleagues, take a break, take a walk—this is your time for a breather!

    4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

    Breakout Sessions

    Disrupting Philanthropy by Watering the Seeds of Creativity
    Panel Icon Panel

    This session will share the path, process, and lessons learned over an 18-month timeframe in redistributing $2.7 million to BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) artists, culture bearers, and organizations. The Waterers are disruptors of philanthropy that stemmed out of Local Control, Local Fields, an initiative of ArtPlace America and people-powered process, led by grassroots Assemblies in six geographies, which shaped the use of a funding pool to further strengthen their local creative place-tending field of practice. The Upper Midwest Assembly entrusted the Waterers to steward funds for Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and the 23 Native Nations as colonized into 3 states by scores of treaties, centering BIPOC creatives as leaders. This session explores the Waterers’ gift-making strategy, including nuances and complexities of this region and in investing in small, local, and the non-colonial, as well as embracing a vision for transformative impact and lasting change.

    John Davis, Leadership Team, Waterers.org
    Michelle Dubray, Leadership Team, Waterers.org / Director, Pinto Horse Woman Consulting

    Location: Ambassador Ballroom

    The Future of For- and Nonprofit Arts Relationships
    Panel Icon Panel

    The COVID-19 pandemic brought a unique and unprecedented opportunity for the for-profit entertainment industries and nonprofit arts and culture institutions to come together to collectively advocate for and secure relief funding for their live entertainment related businesses, organizations, artists, and creative workers. As the field moves into a new world, what’s next? CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act), SVOG (Shuttered Venue Operating Grant), and ARPA (American Recovery Plan Act) funds largely dissolved existing dividing lines of eligibility. Are these relationships rooted, or did they arise solely in a time of crisis? Is there a future where the nonprofit and for-profit arts worlds are linked? In this session, attendees will hear from a local music venue owner, an advocate for cross-sector relief, and national for-profit business associations to explore where creative economy partners can go from here.

    Frank Cullen, Jr., Vice President, Global Innovation Policy Center, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
    Audrey Fix Schaefer, Director of Communications, I.M.P. / VP of the Board of Directors, National Independent Venue Association

    Taneshia Nash Laird, President and CEO, Newark Symphony Hall

    Location: Empire Ballroom

    Roundtables: Creative Economy & Creative Workforce // Public Art & Civic Design
    Discussion Icon Roundtable

    With so much discussion about creative workers and the creative economy, this is your opportunity to have intimate dialogues and learn about new projects and trends. Plus, explore the latest trends in public art and civic design.

    Location: Diplomat Ballroom

    Roundtable Presentations:
  • TABLE 1: Advancing Indigenous Performance: Native American Performing Artists Making a Difference
    Presented by:
    Scott Stoner, Evaluation/Program Consultant, AIP Program, Arts for Now

    This roundtable will focus on the role and impact of Native American performing artists working with communities across the U.S. and internationally over the past four years in conjunction with the Western Arts Alliance’s Advancing Indigenous Performance (AIP) program. Over 30 artists have been engaged in and supported by the AIP program to build cultural competence with presenters; create contemporary work that is at the intersection of culture, identify, and community; and, align Native Arts practice with social justice issues and social change. The presentation will explore examples and strategies from practice around catalysts, entry points, and vocabulary for constructive dialogue about the content, context, and impact of Indigenous work that uplifts the intercultural life of the community. It will also guide participants to sources of additional information and resources about contemporary Native American performing arts.
     

  • TABLE 2: Public Art on a Shoestring Budget
    Presented by:
    Brendan Smith, Arts and Humanities Coordinator, City of Takoma Park, MD

    Even a small public art budget can have a big impact! You can design and implement many creative public art projects on a shoestring budget which engage the public, support the livelihoods of local artists, and enliven public spaces in your community. Brendan Smith is the arts and humanities coordinator for the City of Takoma Park in Maryland where he organizes a wide range of low-budget public art projects on a part-time schedule with a part-time intern. Public art can (and should) extend beyond the traditional model of painting more murals to include interactive and creative placemaking endeavors. Smith has designed innovative public art projects and adapted projects tried elsewhere to support Takoma Park’s reputation as an arts-friendly city. In one memorable project, a 17-foot-tall crocheted octopus landed atop Takoma Park's downtown clock tower where it lived for 6 months before a pack of preschoolers carted it away during the “Great Octoshedopus Parade.”
     

  • TABLE 3: Cultural Districts: Civic Engagement, Social Infrastructure, and Third Spaces
    Presented by:
    Hsin-Ching Wu, Assistant Professor, College of Charleston

    Cities and towns around the world have instituted cultural districts for various purposes based on the understanding that arts and culture offer instrumental benefits to their communities, such as revitalizing the local economy, improving quality of life, attracting visitors and new residents. Given the increased polarization of US society, it is vital to go beyond traditional economic development arguments and identify and explore the full range of impacts Cultural Districts produce, and how they are sustained. This research explores the role of cultural districts play in improving social infrastructure, fostering civic engagement, and increasing social capital. We examined the goals and objectives contained in the grant proposals submitted to the Massachusetts Cultural Council for the 51 state-designated Cultural Districts in Massachusetts from 2015 to 2021. Based on our findings, we offer recommendations for leveraging existing community development practices centered on arts and culture activities to facilitate increased civic engagement.
     

  • TABLE 4: How Virtual Communities Support Creative Placemaking
    Presented by:
    Megan Ihnen, Executive Director, Live Music Projecct

    The Live Music Project has been strengthening community, celebrating listener agency, and amplifying local arts resources in Seattle for seven years. This roundtable presentation shares the ways we activate virtual communities to enhance creative placemaking strategies in Seattle. We focus on strengthening the sense of community among local ensembles, building new ties among volunteers and listeners, audience cross-pollination, outward presentation of each geographic area as a strong community of creative performance and musical genesis. Now that we have launched an enhanced version of our website, we are able to support music communities all over the United States. In this presentation, we apply our findings from growing in Seattle to arts advocacy, creative industry engagement, and creative placemaking and share how we will implement those in our next phase of growth. Roundtable participants will come away from this with strategies they can apply to their work and creative ecosystem development.
     

  • TABLE 5: NoCo Mural Mile: A Community Created Mural Walk
    Presented by:
    Emily Dippie, Public Art Administrator, Jeffersonville Public Art Administrator

    The NoCo Mural Mile is a model for how to involve community members (no matter the skill level or age) in completing a large-scale mural walk. In October of 2021, 176 community members in Jeffersonville came together to paint 1500 linear feet of sidewalk mural. This project provided a one-of-a-kind wayfinding tool for the Jeffersonville arts and cultural district from the bustling downtown area. In addition to adding beauty to our city and boosting walkability, this project model builds incredible community ownership by allowing community members to paint the mural mile in themselves with their families. This roundtable will give an overview of the project details, administration, and day of concerns for any group wishing to replicate a project of this kind.
     

  • TABLE 6: Engagement and Activation of Public Art Collection
    Presented by:
    Deirdre Ehlen MacWilliams, Public Art Project Manager, Arlington Public Art

    "There is no set formula for community engagement. The best way to program and engage a specific community is to listen to citizens about their needs and consider the capacity of the selected public artist. 
    What happens once the artwork has been installed and how do you get people to think about the artwork long after the ribbon cutting?
    I would like to highlight a few engagement and activation projects that helped the broader community better understand their public art collection. These mostly occurred in real life, but also happened online.  
    A few project highlights:
    •    Commemorating Arlington’s Civil Rights History with artist Amos Paul Kennedy, Jr. 
    •    Yoga Inspired by Sculpture 
    •    The “I” in Civic 
    •    Coin Collection and Sort, the community donated, counted and sorted 4,784 collected coins, representing 117 countries and every continent (except Antarctica)! (Artist Donald Lipski)
    •    Collecting Color Memories that will be reflected on 28 bus shelters along Columbia Pike. (Artist Spencer Finch)"
     

  • TABLE 7: Activating Data: Creative Strategies and New Approaches to Digital Public Art Collection Management
    Presented by:
    Lori Goldstein, Manager, Public Art Archive, WESTAF

    Digital public art collections have become ubiquitous, especially as the pandemic has heightened urgency to provide publicly accessible, self-guided experiences of public art. Platforms that provide dual functions of collections management simultaneously with portals for public access are widely available; these platforms undoubtedly direct the public to visit installation sites and provide details about particular works of art. But in the race to digitize, we have collectively missed opportunities to analyze, (re)discover, and (re)imagine the implications of digital collections, rendering many disconnected from their physical counterparts. Little attention has been paid towards myriad approaches to these platforms. Without thoughtful consideration, the collections may inaccurately represent the dynamism of public art and inhibit critical contextual examinations of its purposes and impacts. Thinking beyond these systems as static repositories, this roundtable will explore how these platforms can be tapped to illuminate public art collections as dynamic engagement tools with the potential to activate public agency and incite positive change in public space, prior to inception and after installation and removal.
     

  • TABLE 8: Creating Equity and Access in Cultural Ecosystems through Shared Digital Infrastructure
    Presented by:
    Samuel Bowler, Founder, Director, Culturalyst

    Cultural communities are hard to map. There are many actors exchanging value -- artists, organizations, consumers, businesses, educational institutions. While the dynamism of local cultural ecosystems is beautiful, their complexity can further systemic inequity and block certain communities from accessing opportunities, patronage, and relief aid. Centralized digital resources, such as directories or listings, can help democratize access to information, but these are expensive, ever-evolving initiatives for individual organizations and cities to develop and bring to market. To account for this, cultural communities are beginning to collaborate on building a shared digital infrastructure that can serve an individual community within a network connecting all of them. In doing so, marginalized artists, organizations, and events are centered and searchable within and across cultural communities, alongside information on opportunities for funding, relief aid, residencies, and more. Come learn about Culturalyst, a shared digital infrastructure, and the cultural communities moving it forward.
     

  • TABLE 9: Creating Tomorrow’s Leaders through Multifaceted Arts Education
    Presented by:
    Anna Klimala, President, Miami Music Project

    Students completing today’s arts education programs face different demands in the workforce than their earlier counterparts. The recent pandemic forced music education organizations to adapt to a new landscape of learning and consider delivery methods outside of traditional performance settings. For Miami Music Project, this opened a world of possibilities for how to best serve students. By combining El Sistema-inspired, social-emotional learning-based orchestral training with educational partnerships, music business partnerships, and summer work opportunities, our Young Musicians’ Development Program equips students with tools for professional success. This roundtable explores how Miami Music Project uses various pathways to further equitable access to musical and non-musical career training in communities with untapped potential.
     

  • TABLE 10: Case Study in Cultural Asset Mapping: Nos Vemos/We See Us
    Presented by:
    Holly Hampton, Senior Manager, Transportation Planning Metro Art, LA Metro

    Los Angeles County is in the midst of a mobility transformation as Metro delivers the largest transportation building program in North America. Since its inception, Metro Art has engaged in community-driven place-based research resulting in arts and cultural resources that influence planning for public transportation art programs. Our presentation will look at Metro Art tailored approaches to broadening community engagement through deep, long-term community investment from early project planning through construction and beyond. We will share a recent project funded through the Government Alliance on Race and Equity and Race Forward, Nos Vemos/We See Us, to stimulate knowledge-sharing about community-engaged cultural asset mapping strategies. Through Nos Vemos/We See Us, Metro Art commissioned four Southeast Los Angeles-based artists to lead public engagement activities that reveal what makes their neighborhoods special. Participants will learn and discuss best practices and lessons learned related to project development, creative outreach, and arts-led community engagement.
     

  • TABLE 11: Measuring The Collective Impact of Community-driven Public Art
    Presented by:
    Jing Huang, MS/MPH candidate, Tufts University

    In Boston Chinatown’s Hudson Street, residents were displaced by a highway in the 1950’s and since then, continuous gentrification. How can art invite long-time and new residents to honor the past while re-imagining a more just future? How can art build empathy and power so residents can shape their cultural and physical landscapes? Hudson Street Stoop (HSS) is an 18-month rotating public art initiative, presented by the Asian Community Development Corporation (ACDC), to create a modern-day stoop where Chinatown residents can connect across racial, socioeconomic, and generational backgrounds while centering the experiences of those most at risk of displacement. Together, an ACDC staff, a HSS artist or community member, and a representative of the culturally-informed evaluation team from Tufts University will present ACDC’s creative placekeeping strategy, the community-driven artwork development of the inaugural HSS installation Storytell & Sway, and the measurable impact this installation has had on the neighborhood.
     

  • TABLE 12: Share Your Thoughts with the Americans for the Arts Strategic Realignment Consultants
    Presented by:
    Members of Arts Consulting Group

    Take this opportunity to join an intimate conversation with Arts Consulting Group, one of the teams working on Americans for the Arts' Strategic Realignment Process. Bring whatever thoughts you have to share!

  • 6:00 PM - 7:15 PM

    What Does Strategic Change Take? An Interactive Conversation with Nolen V. Bivens
    Interactive icon Interactive

    We invite you to participate in an interactive session—with some light hors d’oeuvres and drinks thrown in!—to listen and engage with Americans for the Arts’ President and CEO Nolen V. Bivens. The conversation will focus around the six core principles that are driving the organization’s ongoing transformation. Structured as a “salon-style” conversational gathering, this dialogue welcomes diverse points of view, and will allow attendees to share thoughts and explore ideas about organizational change. 

    Nolen V. Bivens, President and CEO, Americans for the Arts
    Shannon Daut, Manager of Cultural Affairs, City of Santa Monica (facilitator)

    Location: Ambassador Ballroom

    Friday, May 20, 2022

    8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

    Breakfast
    A fork and spoon inside a circle Meal

    Breakfast will be offered with flexibility to allow you to eat with colleagues, head back to your room, eat outside, or whatever other arrangement is best for you!

    9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

    Morning Mainstage

    Hopes, Dreams, and Goals as Part of the Americans for the Arts Strategic Realignment Process
    A stage with spotlights shining down from the rafters Mainstage

    In this interactive mainstage presentation and conversation with you, Americans for the Arts staff and board members, supported by Hope Nation and Arts Consulting Group, will share the steps we are taking to strategically realign the organization and plan for the future and will lead a fun, arts-centric collaborative process with attendees to look toward the future, map the hopes and dreams of the field, and celebrate our shared, ongoing transformation. Using the frames of Appreciative Inquiry, attendees will have the opportunity not only to weigh in on the future form and function of Americans for the Arts, but to share their own hopes, dreams, and goals for their organization and community.

    Dr. Maria Rosario Jackson, Chair, National Endowment for the Arts (pre-recorded remarks)
    Michelle Boone, President and CEO, Poetry Foundation; member of the board, Americans for the Arts

    Randy Cohen, Vice President of Research, Americans for the Arts
    Daniel Fitzmaurice, Chief of Staff, Americans for the Arts
    Heather Flanagan, Senior Coordinator, Leadership Alliances, Americans for the Arts
    April Harris, Creative Forces Project Operations and Federal Grant Administrator, Americans for the Arts
    Ruby Lopez Harper, Vice President of Equity and Local Arts Engagement, Americans for the Arts
    Laura Martin, Executive Office Manager, Americans for the Arts
    Marissa Shadburn, Senior Coordinator, Creative Community Advancement, Americans for the Arts
    Genna Styles-Lyas, AEP6 Director, Community Engagement & Equity, Americans for the Arts
    Adrianne Troilo, Vice President, People & Culture, Americans for the Arts
    Patricia Walsh, Director, Creative Community Advancement, Americans for the Arts

    Artistic presentation from Coral Morphologic

    Location: Regency Ballroom

    10:15 AM - 10:45 AM

    Networking and Breathing Break
    An icon of a coffee mug with a clock in front of it Break

    Connect with colleagues, take a break, take a walk—this is your time for a breather!

    10:45 AM - 12:00 PM

    Breakout Sessions

    Principles and Purpose of Trauma Informed Arts & Organizations
    Panel Icon Panel

    The global refugee crisis and COVID-19 are leaving an indelible mark on the 21st century. Leaders tasked with nurturing the well-being and equitable empowerment of communities are increasingly highlighting the impact of trauma-causing events such as the pandemic, refugee crisis, and systemic oppression on communities, artists, and organizations. Events such as the pandemic have changed the purpose, design, and delivery of the arts, opening a path for art, arts education practices, and organizations to address the social and cultural challenges communities and individuals face. The arts are increasingly moving into positions of social activism and creative facilitation by working within communities to mitigate trauma, foster empathy, and nurture intercultural competence. This session will investigate how trauma informed arts practices and organizations honor the diverse experiences individuals bring to the arts; ways the arts can nurture growth, equity, and diversity; the impact of primary and vicarious trauma; and how the arts are used as tools of recovery and resiliency.

    Dr. Kyna Elliott, Ph.D., Executive Director, Global Arts Creative

    Location: Empire Ballroom

    We Are Bound: What Is Needed to Improve Treatment of Creative Workers
    Panel Icon Panel

    COVID-19 devastated the creative economy and hit creative workers particularly hard. But the truth is that all that devastation was in part the product of chronic and systemic inequitable treatment of creative workers by public policymakers, cultural organizations, and funders—often unknowingly (and/or unwillingly) abetted by creative workers themselves. In this session, learn about We Are Bound, a multi-part research, policy, and sector transformation project that questions why the creative sector is in constant need of relief, how public policy can be shifted to improve support for independent workers, and what steps the cultural sector needs to take to equitably care for the humans that make up its backbone.

    Lisa Yancey, President, Yancey Consulting
    Raquel Farrell-Kirk, Art Therapist/Researcher, American Art Therapy Association
    Stacey M. Kesten, Ph.D., Co-Founder & Principal Consultant, Collaborators Consulting Group

    Clay Lord, Vice President of Strategic Impact, Americans for the Arts

    Location: Ambassador Ballroom

    Roundtables: The Next Big Things // Workplace Culture
    Discussion Icon Roundtable

    What's new, innovative, or coming over the horizon? Join this roundtable session for small group conversations about some of those projects and ideas. And as we head back to being face-to-face, workplace culture is more crucial than ever before. Join conversations to learn more about how to improve it!

    Location: Diplomat Ballroom

    Roundtable Presentations:
  • TABLE 1: Using Enlightenment in the Arts to Increase Arts Participation
    Presented by:
    Sonimar Maldonado-Alvarado, Development and Communications Associate, Ann Arbor Art Center (A2AC)

    Enlightenment can be described as a moment of sudden understanding or realization of something. There have been countless occurrences within the arts where either the artist or the spectator have experienced such a moment. These experiences are recounted as impactful, memorable, and thrilling, as well as moments that are, for the most part, desirable. These events are the ones that leave a bookmark in our memory, the ones we are delighted to share with others, and the ones we crave to experience again. This research is focused on understanding these eureka moments within the arts, their process, impact, and possible uses.
     

  • TABLE 2: The New Age of Arts Journalism: Locally-Driven Advocacy for Increased Community Engagement in the Arts
    Presented by:
    Carrie Beth Wallace, Founder, Editor-in-chief, The Columbusite

    "Imagine not having to fight for positive, polished, and accessible coverage of the arts in your community. 

    At The Columbusite, our team has developed a locally-driven digital and print platform that has increased and expanded community engagement within the arts. I'm interested in exploring ways with your audience that our model could be adapted in their communities. 

    In 2017, I was notified my job as an arts reporter had been eliminated by McClatchy Publishing because ""arts stories just don't get the clicks and make the money we're looking for."" As an arts advocate, a classically-trained musician, and a writer, this set me on a path to create a voice for the arts in our community. 

    I'd love to lead a Roundtable or Present a session about how our model has achieved success, and offer tips and tools to others in communities where it might be a good fit."
     

  • TABLE 3: The Great Transformation: How COVID-19 is Shifting Our Work Culture
    Presented by:
    Nicole Touzien, Executive Director, Dancewave

    In this interactive session, arts leaders are invited to discuss and explore new approaches to enhancing workplace culture. From remote working arrangements to four-day work weeks and everything in between, COVID-19 has required employers to respond creatively to evolving workforce needs. Hear from a Brooklyn-based dance organization on how operationalizing new equitable and employee-centered policies and procedures have helped to enhance workplace culture. Attendees are invited to share their own successes and challenges associated with leadership and people management during a global pandemic. Learn about new and creative approaches to enhancing and sustaining workplace culture now and in a post-COVID world.
     

  • TABLE 4: Social Survival: Art, Economy, & Wellbeing in Absence of Third Spaces
    Presented by:
    Denese Neu, Consultant, Social Infrastructure Consultancy

    Following two years of decreased interaction and restricted use of venues, this roundtable will explore ideas for multi-sector planning. Studies show a strong correlation between social isolation and poor health outcomes. They also show a strong correlation between the arts and wellbeing.  In 2021, Americans for the Arts called for the integration of art in the national emergency management system, but how might artists function as a part of the public health system for therapeutic benefits and the wellbeing of society? Designed as a mini-charrette, this roundtable will dive into the benefits of creativity during crisis and propose new ideas for shifting the creative economy during times of disruption. Observations from Hurricane Katrina and the pandemic will serve as a basis for discussion about art as a fundamental, and financially-supported, social intervention.
     

  • TABLE 5: Resiliency and the Arts: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Harvey
    Presented by:
    Lauren Hainley, Director, Disaster Services, Houston Arts Alliance

    "Almost three years after the destruction of Hurricane Harvey, the cultural ecosystem’s clearest lesson is that most of the region’s arts, cultural and historic preservation communities are unprepared for the next disruption. This is a result of a critical gap that exists between the cultural and emergency management ecosystems.
    The Disaster Resiliency and the Arts in the Houston Area report:
    • Sorts through the dozens of opportunities, needs and questions that surfaced during the recovery period following Hurricane Harvey
    • Outlines how we can capitalize on the connections created with national experts and existing disaster response systems for the betterment of our community
    • Provides 21 key findings and strategic recommendations for initiatives and efforts that will help the arts ecosystem become more resilient in the face of disasters
    • Offers an overview of the emergency management and cultural ecosystems for those seeking to better understand these systems and nurture collaboration between them"
     

  • TABLE 6: Relationships, Retention, and Revenue
    Presented by:
    Antoinette Kula, Senior Manager, Ticket Sales and Service, Playhouse Square

    The driving force to retain employees and patrons along with increasing revenue is relationship building.  These relationships are with our internal clients (team members) and our external clients (our patrons).  This roundtable will focus on the research done at Playhouse Square and Colorado State University and reinforced by the CX Coaching Methodology.  With positive, attentive, meaningful, and forward moving relationships, Playhouse Square retains at a high rate employees, patrons, resident companies, and revenue streams.  The attention to building relationships leads to the retention on all fronts and equates to additional revenue streams and increased revenue overall.   During the discussion attendees will learn the meaning of and techniques on how to use FORD with both their teams and patrons. FORD (Family, Occupation, Recreation, and Dreams) is an acronym used for relationship building and finding the gift in every conversation or interaction.
     

  • TABLE 7: Virtual & Hybrid Events: They're Important & Here to Stay
    Presented by:
    Rowen Haigh, Director of Education and Outreach, National Women's Theatre Festival

    The Covid-19 pandemic thrust the country into a remote/virtual work, collaboration, and event space. After over a year of gathering virtually, many organizations are eager to get back to in-person gatherings and leave behind the virtual space. Not us, though! Join the leadership team of the National Women's Theatre Festival to discuss why we believe virtual and hybrid programming is here to stay and why it's an important companion to in-person programming.
     

  • TABLE 8: Making Change While Making a Living
    Presented by:
    Elizabeth Stookey-Sunde, Co-Founder/Executive Director, Music to Life

    "Our country is home to a multitude of musicians, and the majority work independently. They are self-made entrepreneurs with a robust online presence, intimate connections with fans, and grassroots engagement with their local communities. Perfectly positioned changemakers, indeed, many of these artists also have innovative ideas for music-driven programs that tackle pressing issues. Still, their concepts remain largely untapped given limited training, strategic connections, and resources. 

    Join Music to Life as we discuss the challenges and successes of today’s Activist Musicians who are bringing about innovative social change to their communities and how this is helping provide a needed economic jump-start and revitalization effort among musicians."
     

  • TABLE 9: How Virtual Communities Support Creative Placemaking
    Presented by:
    Megan Ihnen, Executive Director, Live Music Projecct

    The Live Music Project has been strengthening community, celebrating listener agency, and amplifying local arts resources in Seattle for seven years. This roundtable presentation shares the ways we activate virtual communities to enhance creative placemaking strategies in Seattle. We focus on strengthening the sense of community among local ensembles, building new ties among volunteers and listeners, audience cross-pollination, outward presentation of each geographic area as a strong community of creative performance and musical genesis. Now that we have launched an enhanced version of our website, we are able to support music communities all over the United States. In this presentation, we apply our findings from growing in Seattle to arts advocacy, creative industry engagement, and creative placemaking and share how we will implement those in our next phase of growth. Roundtable participants will come away from this with strategies they can apply to their work and creative ecosystem development.
     

  • TABLE 10: Getting Rid of Gatekeepers: The New Play Exchange
    Presented by:
    Gwydion Suilebhan, Project Director, New Play Exchange, National New Play Network

    The New Play Exchange (NPX) is the world's largest digital library of scripts by living writers, as well as a dynamic platform that helps connect theater artists with each other and with needed resources. Since it's inception, the NPX has been an egalitarian and inclusive platform: much more representative than the American theater as a whole. How have we achieved that goal? What lessons can be learned about how to increase participation in the arts? What "sacred" assumptions need to be challenged to make that happen? Gwydion Suilebhan, NPX Project Director, will share what he's learned after eight years and 1.4 million users.
     

  • TABLE 11: Creating Equity and Access in Cultural Ecosystems through Shared Digital Infrastructure
    Presented by:
    Samuel Bowler, Founder, Director, Culturalyst

    Cultural communities are hard to map. There are many actors exchanging value -- artists, organizations, consumers, businesses, educational institutions. While the dynamism of local cultural ecosystems is beautiful, their complexity can further systemic inequity and block certain communities from accessing opportunities, patronage, and relief aid. Centralized digital resources, such as directories or listings, can help democratize access to information, but these are expensive, ever-evolving initiatives for individual organizations and cities to develop and bring to market. To account for this, cultural communities are beginning to collaborate on building a shared digital infrastructure that can serve an individual community within a network connecting all of them. In doing so, marginalized artists, organizations, and events are centered and searchable within and across cultural communities, alongside information on opportunities for funding, relief aid, residencies, and more. Come learn about Culturalyst, a shared digital infrastructure, and the cultural communities moving it forward.
     

  • TABLE 12: Creating Tomorrow’s Leaders through Multifaceted Arts Education
    Presented by:
    Anna Klimala, President, Miami Music Project

    Students completing today’s arts education programs face different demands in the workforce than their earlier counterparts. The recent pandemic forced music education organizations to adapt to a new landscape of learning and consider delivery methods outside of traditional performance settings. For Miami Music Project, this opened a world of possibilities for how to best serve students. By combining El Sistema-inspired, social-emotional learning-based orchestral training with educational partnerships, music business partnerships, and summer work opportunities, our Young Musicians’ Development Program equips students with tools for professional success. This roundtable explores how Miami Music Project uses various pathways to further equitable access to musical and non-musical career training in communities with untapped potential.
     

  • TABLE 13: Share Your Thoughts with the Americans for the Arts Strategic Realignment Consultants
    Presented by:
    Members of Arts Consulting Group

    Take this opportunity to join an intimate conversation with Arts Consulting Group, one of the teams working on Americans for the Arts' Strategic Realignment Process. Bring whatever thoughts you have to share!
     

  • 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM

    Lunch
    A fork and spoon inside a circle Meal

    Lunch will be offered with flexibility to allow you to eat with colleagues, head back to your room, eat outside, or whatever other arrangement is best for you!

    12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

    Midday Mainstage

    Culturebearers Transforming Communities
    A stage with spotlights shining down from the rafters Mainstage

    What could two dance artists—Charya Burt, a classical Cambodian dancer and Christopher “Mad Dog” Thomas, a Chicago Footwork street dancer—possibly have in common?  Besides being culture bearers and innovators of their forms, they are fiercely committed change makers in their communities. Selected as co-recipients of the 2022 Johnson Fellowship for Artists Transforming Communities, don’t miss this conversation about how these radically different dance forms function as cultural grounding in their communities. Hear how both work as teaching artists with youth and community members to heal generational trauma resulting from the Cambodian genocide and issues of violence, policing, and environmental racism in Chicago. Be uplifted by a fascinating “dance dialogue” where Charya and Mad Dog explore the meaning behind their movement.  Moderated by Roko Kawai, dancer, choreographer, and youth worker.   

    Charya Burt, Cambodian Classical Dance master and choreographer
    Christopher "Mad Dog" Thomas, Chicago Footwork street dancer
    Roko Kawai, dancer/choreographer, youth worker

    Artistic performance by Charya Burt and Christopher "Mad Dog" Thomas

    Location: Regency Ballroom

    1:45 PM - 2:15 PM

    Networking and Breathing Break
    An icon of a coffee mug with a clock in front of it Break

    Connect with colleagues, take a break, take a walk—this is your time for a breather!

    2:15 PM - 3:30 PM

    Breakout Sessions

    Advocacy for What Matters (to You)
    Panel Icon Panel

    Ever wonder how to get in front of your elected officials and successfully bring your agenda to life? This session is a crash course in meeting with elected officials with clarity, confidence, and your agenda. Attendees will focus on the process, practice, and simple tools to support your work in your community. Bring your ideas, pitches, or sketches of what you and your community want/need, and we will talk in real terms and real time about how to get on the agenda and get results. This session will cover how to find who to speak with, how to get on their calendar, how to frame your ask, and how to close (aka how to get what you want/need).

    Shani Harris-Bagwell, Consultant, Bagwell Consulting

    Location: Empire Ballroom

    Social Justice as a Foundation for Engaging the Community
    Panel Icon Panel

    This session is a discussion about the value and impact of social justice initiatives as a forum for activation in at the local level. What is relevant to people today? How can arts audiences be more connected? How do we deepen relevancy to the arts organizations? Join this interactive dialogue to explore how you and your organization can more deeply connect your arts-related work to broader social justice movements.

    Donna Walker-Kuhne, President, Walker Communications Group

    Location: Ambassador Ballroom

    Roundtables: Cultural and Racial Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion // Grantmaking and Resource Distribution
    Discussion Icon Roundtable

    This is your opportunity for small group dialogues about the most pressing issue of our day, racial and cultural equity, as well as innovations in and conversations about grantmaking and resource distribution. Both topics will be crucial to the future of the field. Join the dialogue!

    Location: Regency Ballroom

    Roundtable Presentations:
  • TABLE 1: Advancing Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in Arts & Design Higher Education
    Presented by:
    Deborah Obalil, President & Executive Director, Association of Independent Colleges of Art & Design (AICAD)

    Arts and design higher education plays a critical role in educating students who enter the professional creative fields and those who will ultimately rise to leadership positions and be in a position to impact the structures and biases present. To be an effective partner in advancing equity in the arts professions and design industry, higher education institutions must address their own inequitable histories and structures. AICAD will share the programs it has developed to address many of these issues and the impact they have had on greater faculty and leadership diversity and equity in arts and design colleges. The programs include the AICAD Post Graduate Teaching Fellowship, which offers professional development to graduating BIPOC students in the association in pursuit of careers teaching in higher education; the BIPOC Academic Leadership Institute; and multiple symposia on diversity in the academy and inclusive pedagogy.

  • TABLE 2: Arts-Based Social Mobility: Exploring Cultural Capital in Charlotte, NC
    Presented by:
    Meg Whalen, Director of Communications & External Relations, UNC Charlotte College of Arts + Architecture

    This Roundtable presentation will introduce preliminary results from the project, “Arts-based social mobility: Exploring cultural capital in Charlotte, NC,” funded by a Research Grant in the Arts from the National Endowment for the Arts and carried out by an interdisciplinary team from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. A variety of artists and arts organizations in Charlotte create work and offer programs with the explicit goal of positive social impact. Many such activities aspire to increase the cultural capital of participants through arts education, community-based cultural events, creative placemaking, and other types of arts-based experiences. Based on semi-structured interviews, this research explores how local artists and organizations conceptualize and assess the social impact of the arts, what motivates participation in those activities, and how both providers and participants describe those experiences. The project was developed in response to a city/county task force report addressing low economic mobility in Charlotte.

  • TABLE 3: ¡Looking Bilingüe! The Power & Permanence of Storytelling in the Latiné Community
    Presented by:
    Jade Cintrón Báez, Founder, Artistic Director & Host, ¡Looking Bilingüe!

    Latinx/és: why should we tell our story, what does that look like and how can we create a permanent space for them through the arts? In this roundtable, we discuss storytelling as an artform, a tool and form of expression as seen through the work of ¡Looking Bilingüe!, a storytelling series empowering the multiculturalism and multilingualism of the Latinx/é community. We will examine why and how storytelling should be the Latinx/é community’s archival method: a living, breathing, and growing collection of stories that bring to the forefront and prevent the erasure of our Black and Indigenous roots, while acknowledging the history of storytelling in that very ancestry. Understanding our lived experience of being ni de aquí, ni de allá or “neither from here nor from there”, we will explore how the validity of Latinx/é stories can differ or be challenged within their own communities as well as outside of them.

  • TABLE 4: Everyone's Welcome: Creating Mission Statements That Reflect Community Values
    Presented by:
    Andrew Brown, Admissions Counselor, University of Indianapolis

    This research aims to determine how U.S. Orchestras could incorporate Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in their mission statements to combat issues of social inequity both within their organization and within their surrounding communities. An analysis of literature centered around mission statements and CSR revealed a two-pronged approach to current orchestral engagement: external outreach and internal regulation. External outreach represents orchestra-to-community strategies (i.e. community concerts). Internal regulation differs in that orchestras design policies and procedures within the business model to guarantee organizational diversity. (e.g. multicultural fellowships.) 97 active mission statements and community engagement programs were analyzed using Frances Bowen’s “Continuum of Community Engagement” to reveal that traditional engagement has formed a ‘pipeline’ of transactional and transitional engagement, but fails to create transformational engagement.  The author of this paper proposes a new model of engagement for U.S. orchestras based off on Bowen’s CSR model: “The Sonata-Allegro Methods of Engagement.” (S.A.M.E.)

  • TABLE 5: Getting Rid of Gatekeepers: The New Play Exchange
    Presented by:
    Gwydion Suilebhan, Project Director, New Play Exchange, National New Play Network

    The New Play Exchange (NPX) is the world's largest digital library of scripts by living writers, as well as a dynamic platform that helps connect theater artists with each other and with needed resources. Since it's inception, the NPX has been an egalitarian and inclusive platform: much more representative than the American theater as a whole. How have we achieved that goal? What lessons can be learned about how to increase participation in the arts? What "sacred" assumptions need to be challenged to make that happen? Gwydion Suilebhan, NPX Project Director, will share what he's learned after eight years and 1.4 million users.

  • TABLE 6: Autistic Student Engagement in Theatre and Dance Classrooms
    Presented by:
    Winter Phong, Assistant Professor and Director of Arts Administration, Oklahoma State University

    Historically, theatre and dance have had challenging relationships with disability to say the least. This challenge stems from ableist perspectives that fail to consider specific needs and experiences of persons with disabilities. At all levels, from youth education to training, to professional performance, opportunities are limited. Alluding to the progress of participation from student to professional, the National Endowment for the Arts, starting in 1982 and continuing on a quinquennial basis, conducts a Survey for Public Participation in the Arts, which consistently shows that supporting arts engagement early in life predictably improves overall educational outcomes and directly affects participation in arts as an adult. Often, performing arts engagement is limited to audience seats for individuals with disabilities, more frequently this focus is on relaxed performances geared toward those identified as autistic. As the prevalence of autism diagnoses have increased, theatre and dance courses must rethink engagement practices. This session explores how theatre practitioners and educators might plan for engagement of autistic students in theatre or dance classroom.

  • TABLE 7: More Than Money: Providing Support Beyond Funding
    Presented by:
    Phil Davis, Countywide Arts Coordinator, Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission

    Our conversations about supporting the arts and creating a more equitable field inevitably lead to talk about money. But, money is only part of the story. This roundtable will explore ways large organizations, funders, and arts agencies support artists and smaller organizations beyond providing funds. The discussion will begin by sharing some of the ways the Department of Parks and Recreation in Prince George’s County, MD has worked to host artist-led projects, provide access to spaces, offer in-kind support, and build capacity through program collaboration, in addition to the funding it provides to arts organizations. These easily replicable initiatives will lead off a discussion to foster ideas that we can hopefully all take back to implement in our own communities.

  • TABLE 8: White Supremacy in the American Cultural Sector
    Presented by:
    Benjamen Douglas, Fellow & PhD student, Applied Intercultural Arts Research, University of Arizona

    This roundtable will include a presentation on the history of white supremacy in the American arts and culture sector—from the founding of this nation on Turtle Island, through the establishment of national tastes and the stratification of the sector around the Civil War, to the founding of the National Endowment for the Arts. It will include ways that funders have perpetuated white supremacy by using their funding to cement ideological and aesthetic preferences, and will end with discussion with participants about their lived experiences in the arts and culture sector to develop the history for publication.

  • TABLE 9: The Role of Mentorship in Creating a More Equitable Creative Economy
    Presented by:
    Mylo Mendez, Muralist, Creative Action

    This roundtable will explore how an apprenticeship or expanded mentorship model within a Creative Youth Development organization can extend relationships with youth beyond high school programming to create alternative pathways to training and employment in the arts. Many young people do not see college as an accessible or necessary entry point, or even with schooling find barriers to entering the creative career field. We will examine potential solutions by looking at the model of Chroma Collective, a working collective of young artists guided by a Lead Muralist to create public and community art.

  • TABLE 10: Advancing Indigenous Performance: Native American Performing Artists Making a Difference
    Presented by:
    Scott Stoner, Evaluation/Program Consultant, AIP Program, Arts for Now

    This roundtable will focus on the role and impact of Native American performing artists working with communities across the U.S. and internationally over the past four years in conjunction with the Western Arts Alliance’s Advancing Indigenous Performance (AIP) program. Over 30 artists have been engaged in and supported by the AIP program to build cultural competence with presenters; create contemporary work that is at the intersection of culture, identify, and community; and, align Native Arts practice with social justice issues and social change. The presentation will explore examples and strategies from practice around catalysts, entry points, and vocabulary for constructive dialogue about the content, context, and impact of Indigenous work that uplifts the intercultural life of the community. It will also guide participants to sources of additional information and resources about contemporary Native American performing arts.

  • TABLE 11: Share Your Thoughts with the Americans for the Arts Strategic Realignment Consultants
    Presented by:
    Members of Arts Consulting Group

    Take this opportunity to join an intimate conversation with Arts Consulting Group, one of the teams working on Americans for the Arts' Strategic Realignment Process. Bring whatever thoughts you have to share!
     

  • 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM

    Networking and Breathing Break
    An icon of a coffee mug with a clock in front of it Break

    Connect with colleagues, take a break, take a walk—this is your time for a breather!

    4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Closing Mainstage

    Onward Together
    A stage with spotlights shining down from the rafters Mainstage

    What comes next for the field, for creative workers, and for the country? How do we progress with humility but also with fortitude? How do we work to fix inequitable systems within our field and also help a country in need of healing to heal? In this closing keynote, poet and Kennedy Center Vice President and Artistic Director of Social Impact Marc Bamuthi Joseph brings the Convention to a powerful, lyrical close meditating on these and other questions of what it takes to truly go onward together. Following Bamuthi's remarks, Americans for the Arts President and CEO Nolen V. Bivens summarizes the last three days and sends you on your way! All of this preceded by Rogue Collective, a tech-infused string quartet like nothing you've ever seen!

    Marc Bamuthi Joseph, poet, Vice President and Artistic Director of Social Impact, Kennedy Center
    Nolen V. Bivens, President and CEO, Americans for the Arts

    Artistic performance by Rogue Collective

    Location: Regency Ballroom