Sessions by Type

Social Impact Case Studies

The Social Impact Case Study is a fast-format session (40 minutes) designed, as the name implies, as an opportunity to present a single case study illustrative of an aspect of social impact.
Community Cohesion: Hyde Square Task Force/Artes Pa'lante
Saturday, June 15, 3:30 pm - 4:15 pm

Learn about how the Hyde Square Task Force engages new residents in efforts to preserve its Latinx identity while making newcomers welcome. Artes Pa’lante connects residents, multi-generational artists, and businesses through outdoor arts interventions.

 

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Education: The Wooden Floor
Saturday, June 15, 3:30 pm - 4:15 pm

Explore how The Wooden Floor uses dance to transform the lives of young people in low-income communities through a long-term approach grounded in exploratory dance education.

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Presenters
Dawn S. Reese
Chief Executive Officer
The Wooden Floor
Santa Ana, California
@DawnSReese


Dawn S. Reese, Chief Executive Officer of The Wooden Floor, is a social innovator who leverages her unique blend of experience in business, technology, education and the arts to propel young people forward. During Dawn’s ten-year tenure, the operating budget has grown from $2.1M to $3.45M and she has led efforts to take its model national by signing their first licensed partner in Washington, DC in November 2015. In 2018, the organization opened its second location in Santa Ana with a third planned by 2020. The Wooden Floor transforms the lives of more young people in low-income communities through the power of dance and access to higher education. Since 2005, 100%   of the seniors who graduate from The Wooden Floor immediately enroll in higher education. Prior to The Wooden Floor, Dawn was the Managing Director of Opera Pacific. Dawn is on the Board of Directors for Orange County Music and Dance, OneOC and the Santa Ana Chamber of Commerce. Dawn is an author, consultant, and national conference presenter on the topics of strategic planning, board governance, fundraising, and leadership development, as well as creative youth development. 

Health/Wellness: Musicians on Call
Saturday, June 15, 3:30 pm - 4:15 pm

Learn about Musicians On Call, which believes that patients, families, and caregivers should benefit from the healing power of music through live performances and the Music Pharmacy, which gives each patient access to a tablet loaded with Pandora and headphones.

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Science/Environment: The Art of a Scientist
Saturday, June 15, 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm

Hear about Art of a Scientist, a program created at Duke University that pairs scientist Ph.D. candidates of various disciplines with visual artists to translate their data and research into art projects to share with the public.

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Discussion

The Discussion format is an opportunity for a moderator and 3-4 discussion leaders to engage a group of attendees in a framed discussion. The moderator and discussion leaders each very briefly speak about their thoughts on the core topic, and then the moderator then facilitates a full group discussion among a circle of attendees.
Equity in the Panel Room
Friday, June 14, 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Based off of "RE-Tool: Racial Equity in the Panel Process" toolkit, this session is designed to help you interrupt racial bias in grant adjudication processes and practices.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Talk through the "RE-Tool" toolkit, and get examples of excellent practice in action.
  2. Explore how to deal with challenging behaviors, including from panelists with different levels of competency/interest in diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  3. Hear about the importance of guiding documents, specific instructions, and facilitation to keep equity centered in grant adjudication.

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Presenters
Eleanor Savage
Program Director
Jerome Foundation
Saint Paul, Minnesota

Eleanor Savage has been at the Jerome Foundation for 10 years and is currently the Program Director. Savage has focused much of her work in the field of arts philanthropy as an advocate for racial equity and undoing racism. She is a founding member of the Racial Equity Funder Collaborative, a MN-based learning and action cohort focused on furthering equity and justice.She recently authored the collaboratively developed RE-Tool: Racial Equity in the Panel Process. Savage is on the board of GIA and is co-chair for GIA’s Support for Individual Artists Committee. Previously, she was the Associate Director of Events and Media Production at Walker Art Center for 16 years. As a queer, civic-minded, anti-racist producer, Savage instigated many community-focused, artist-centered programs in the Twin Cities. Savage received an MFA in Arts Management from Virginia Tech and a BFA in Psychology and Theater from Mercer University.

Session(s): 
Kathy Hsieh
Cultural Partnerships & Grants Manager
Seattle Office of Arts & Culture
Seattle, Washington

Kathy Hsieh is the Cultural Partnerships & Grants Manager for the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture. A change agent in transforming the Office’s community engagement and arts funding practices through a racial equity lens, she helped the agency earn Seattle Management Association’s first Race & Social Justice Management Award. She has served on advisory committees, boards, or panels for many community groups including Fred Hutchinson Research Center's Chinese Women's Cancer Project, People of Color in Philanthropy and Theatre Puget Sound. She received The Seattle Theater Writers Gypsy Award for Excellence in Playwriting and Verizon’s Asian Pacific American Bash’s Innovator Award in 2012, was the International Examiner Community Voice Awardee in the Arts and received a Seattle Times Footlight Award and a Gypsy Award for acting in 2015, and was the recipient of the Gregory A. Falls Sustained Achievement Award in 2017.

Session(s): 
Pam Breaux
President & CEO
National Assembly of State Arts
Washington, District of Columbia

Pam Breaux joined the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) in 2015. As president and CEO, she works with the association’s board of directors and staff to advance NASAA’s policy and programmatic mission to strengthen America’s state and jurisdictional arts agencies. A native of Lafayette, Louisiana, Breaux has held leadership positions at the local, state and national levels. While in Louisiana state government, she was secretary of the Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism (CRT), assistant secretary of CRT (overseeing its cultural development portfolio), and executive director of its state arts agency (the Louisiana Division of the Arts). During her time at CRT, Breaux developed and led Louisiana’s cultural economy initiative and spearheaded the successful UNESCO inscription of Poverty Point State Historic Site (an ancient Indian site) as a World Heritage site. Before working in state government, Breaux was executive director of the Arts and Humanities Council of Southwest Louisiana and managed southwest Louisiana’s Decentralized Arts Funding Program. She has served on the boards of the U.S. Travel Association, NASAA, South Arts and the Louisiana Board of International Commerce. Breaux is currently a member of the U.S. National Commission on UNESCO.

Session(s): 
Preparing Boards and Commissions for Systems Change
Friday, June 14, 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Transforming your organization requires tackling the core of your day-to-day work, which can be difficult for staff and board/commission members. How do you prepare your board/commission to become advocates and allies for systemic change, resource redistribution, and organizational transformation?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how systemic change happens, and why systemic inertia is real.
  2. Explore the unique challenges in educating board/commission members, including demographic information, knowledge base, and their unique role in keeping an "even keel."
  3. Talk specifically about what skills staff leaders need to succeed, and what resources, outside voices, and expertise are available.

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Presenters
Alexis Hill
Arts, Culture, and Events Manager
City of Reno
Reno, Nevada

Alexis Hill manages the City of Reno's Arts, Culture and Events Department at the City of Reno. Her background in governmental regulations, special events, and as a non-profit leader makes her passionate about how special events and arts and culture transform cities. Hill earned her Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Texas A&M University and her Master’s in Public Administration from UNR.

Laura Zucker
Arts Management Consultant
Sherman Oaks, California

Laura Zucker is a nationally recognized arts leader whose expertise spans cultural policy, capital project master planning, arts education, public art, cultural tourism, and funding strategies. She served for 25 years as executive director of the Los Angeles County Arts Commission. In that capacity, Laura managed the civic art policy for the largest county in the United States and directed the funding for more than 400 arts organizations. Major accomplishments during her tenure include implementing the regional initiative to restore arts education to 81 public school districts, heading the California Cultural Tourism Initiative; creating the largest paid arts internship program for undergraduates in the country, and completing the $70 million revitalization of the Ford Amphitheatre. She also was executive producer of the Emmy® Award winning Holiday Celebration. Prior to the Arts Commission, Laura was executive director of the Ventura Arts Council and producing director of the Back Alley Theatre. During   She has served on the boards of Grantmakers in the Arts, and was a founding board member of Arts for LA, which created an annual fellowship in her honor. She received a B.A. from Barnard College and attended the Yale School of Drama.

Robert Bush
President
Arts & Science Council of Charlotte-Mecklenburg
Charlotte, North Carolina

With over 35 years experience, Robert is a nationally known for his work the local arts  agency field.  Since 2000, he served in numerous leadership roles at ASC prior to being named president in 2014.  Before joining ASC, Bush was the president and CEO of the United Arts Council of Raleigh and Wake County, NC and Arts United in Fort Wayne, IN.  He holds a B.S. and  a M.A. with a concentration in Community Education from Appalachian State University.  Bush has served on the faculty of the MAAA program at Goucher College and is currently on the faculty of the MPA program at the University of North Carolina – Charlotte.  He was recognized by AFTA with the 2014 Selina Roberts Ottum Award for Arts Leadership and was  named to the 2014 and 2015 Top 50 Most Powerful and Influential People in the Nonprofit Arts.

Teniqua Broughton
CEO
VerveSimone Consulting LLC
Phoenix, Arizona
Succeeding at Complex Partnerships
Friday, June 14, 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Increasingly, complex partnerships with varied stakeholders are the key to community and student success and support for arts and culture. How can artists, arts organizations, and agencies better prepare for such complicated interactions and attain positive outcomes for all?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explore how agencies, arts groups, and artists can work with other non-arts entities to more effectively support communities.
  2. Hear specific examples of how separate players, with different vocabularies and ways of working, have succeeded in partnering.
  3. Talk through the important components of partnership, including open dialogue, research, expectations, and evaluation.

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Presenters
Debra Garcia y Griego
Cabinet Secretary
New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs
Santa Fe, New Mexico

Debra Garcia y Griego is the Cabinet Secretary for the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. In this capacity, she brings more than 20 years of cultural public policy experience to the stewardship of eight museums, nine historic sites and properties, arts, historic preservation, archaeology and library programs. Prior to her appointment, she was the Executive Director of the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission where she was responsible for implementing the City’s support of arts and cultural affairs such as funding of local nonprofit arts organizations, operation of the Community Gallery, the Art in Public Places program and the City’s international affairs. Previous work experience includes Museum Campus Chicago (a multi-institutional cross-collaboration and –marketing initiative consisting of the John G. Shedd Aquarium, Adler Planetarium, the Field Museum of Natural History and the Chicago Park District), Chicago a cappella, the Southwest Theater and Dance Festival, and the University of New Mexico Department of Theater and Dance. Garcia y Griego serves as an at-large member of the Board of Directors for Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education. She holds a Master of Arts from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art History from the University of New Mexico.

Helen Eaton
Chief Executive Officer
Settlement Music School
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Helen S. Eaton was named one of the Top 30 Innovators in 2016 by Musical America Worldwide, and was recently featured in the CEO interview chapter of Dual Transformation published by Harvard Business Review Press for her work in building systems of innovation at a legacy institution.  Since her arrival, Settlement has increased its financial aid to students—more than $2.6 million each year; launched a comprehensive community engagement effort that has resulted in dozens of partnerships across the city; and initiated significant new programming, receiving major local and national funding.  Settlement is honored to partner with nine music organizations in a city-wide collective impact initiative called the PMAY Artists’ Initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support students from underrepresented communities in becoming professional classical musicians.  In 2018 Settlement was named one of the top 10 music charities in the country working to preserve and expand music education and access to the musical arts by Charity Navigator blog.  Prior to joining Settlement, Helen was President of Chicago Children’s Choir and the Dean of Programs at the Merit School of Music in Chicago.

Creative Economy in Rural Places
Friday, June 14, 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

The growth of the creative sector, and its role in economic development, is a hot topic in rural and suburban communities. The unique challenges of these communities and their governments require different strategies to center creativity and encourage growth.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explore how to grow the creative sector in difficult conditions and over time.
  2. Learn about overcoming obstacles within local government, the local private sector, and among other nonprofit organizations.
  3. Discuss how to create local champions for arts and culture, grow a stable workforce, and encourage conomic growth.

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Presenters
Adam Perry
Vice President for Strategy and Programs
Arts Midwest
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Adam Perry provides strategic leadership for Arts Midwest’s programming, grant making, arts leadership, and community engagement initiatives.


Since joining Arts Midwest in 2006, Adam has led many major cultural programs including Carvanserai, The Big Read Egypt/U.S., and NEA Big Read Films. He also produced the documentary film Muse of Fire for the NEA’s special initiative Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience.


Prior to joining Arts Midwest, he served as director of operations for the Live National/Broadway Across America’s North Central Region as well as various roles including programming and producing manager at Ordway Center for the Performing Arts

Jordan Knepper
Executive Director
Piqua Arts Council
Piqua , Ohio

Executive Director of the Piqua Arts Council, Jordan Knepper is a life-long learner in the arts and now arts administration. He specializes in taking macro-centric topics and applying them to a rural environment to create a richer quality of life for the citizens of Piqua, OH.


Mr. Knepper has traveled across the country attending various trainings and speaking about the arts and arts administration to groups both big and small. His unique ability to meld the creative and industrial sectors has allowed him to see sustained growth with the Piqua Arts Council and attract the attention of regional, state, multi-state and national organizations to spotlight the vibrant arts culture in the community he serves.

Kate Marquez
Executive Director
Southern Arizona Arts & Cultural Alliance
Tucson, Arizona

A Tucson, Arizona native, Kate has served as the Director of the Southern Arizona Arts & Cultural Alliance (SAACA) since 2006. Kate has worked to transform the organization from a defunded rural arts council, into a regional multi-disciplinary arts and cultural alliance known for innovation in the arts, grounded in a sustainable model of growth. Since taking the leadership role over 13 years ago, SAACA has since grown to become one of the largest multi-disciplinary presenting arts organizations in the region, dedicated to the creation, preservation and advancement of the Arts. Each year SAACA provides hundreds of opportunities for artists in the community to present and exhibit their artwork in the community.  Through collaborative Arts and Business partnerships in Healthcare, Economic Development & Tourism, Public Art, Marketing, Education, Banking, and non-arts sector collaborative programming, SAACA's programming serves one of the most diverse sectors of arts and creative sectors in the community, including community arts and music festivals, performing arts, cultural education, programs for Veterans and Seniors, as well as culinary arts, design and more recently, the maker movement.  Kate is the 2017 winner of the Inside Tucson Business Nonprofit CEO of the year, and 2-time nominee for the Arizona Governor’s Arts Awards.

Michele Anderson
Rural Program Director
Springboard for the Arts
Fergus Falls, Minnesota

Michele Anderson is the Rural Program Director for Springboard for the Arts, a community and economic development organizations for artists based in Minnesota. In 2011, she launched Springboard’s office in Fergus Falls, which has become a hub of thought and action about arts-based community development and creative placemaking in rural settings. Michele has her B.A. in Music from Lewis and Clark College, and her M.A. in Cultural Sustainability from Goucher College, where she was awarded the inaugural Rory Turner Prize in Cultural Sustainability in 2014 for her creative nonfiction essay about Springboard’s work in mobilizing artists to foster community interaction about the former Fergus Falls State Hospital. In 2015, Michele was selected by the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits for their Catalytic Leader Award. Prior to her work at Springboard, Michele lived in Portland, Oregon for 11 years where she worked at the Oregon Symphony, and a community music school, Ethos Music Center.

Investing in Accessibility
Friday, June 14, 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

One in five Americans have a disability, so being accessible to all audiences, visitors, and participants is crucial. Local arts agencies (LAAs) have an opportunity to make a difference in making that accessibility possible. This workshop will feature example LAAs with accessibility investments, inspirational projects, and solutions to take home.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn the basics about disability, accessibility, and how they are an important part of diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  2. Gain insight from Local Arts Agencies about how they invest in accessibility in their communities.
  3. Learn how to support cultural organizations in being more inclusive of people with disabilities.

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Presenters
Lane Harwell
Program Officer, Creativity and Free Expression
Ford Foundation
New York, New York

Lane joined the Ford Foundation in 2018, after serving as the founding Executive Director of the service organization Dance/NYC for nearly eight years. Prior to Dance/NYC, he held the senior development role at the arts-wide advocacy group Alliance for the Arts. A lifelong New Yorker and a product of its creative and social justice sectors, Harwell’s history in the arts also includes training at the School of American Ballet and a performance career with American Ballet Theatre Studio Company.


Lane co-chairs the Chancellor’s Arts Committee to the Panel for Education Policy. He is an appointee to New York State’s Blue Ribbon Commission on the Arts and New York City’s Cultural Affairs Advisory Commission and is a member of the Board of New Yorkers for Culture & Arts and leadership committees for Hunter College and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. Lane is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Public Art at the Intersection of Gentrification and Resistance
Friday, June 14, 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

In the face of economic gentrification, public art and artists are frequently vulnerable to displacement. Featuring artists, community organizers, and administrators, this session explores how public art is coming under attack and how its stewards are responding and also using public art as a tool of community agency and resistence.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Discover recent case studies in which public art has been a victim of gentrification, and how communities have responded.
  2. Explore how public art can be a mechanism for resistance and community history.
  3. Discuss how public art can survive and thrive, while avoiding becoming part of gentrification itself.

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Presenters
Tracie Hall
The Joyce Foundation
Chicago, Illinois

Prior to her appointment as Director of the Joyce Foundation’s Culture Program, Tracie D. Hall served as Deputy Commissioner of Chicago's Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events where she oversaw the Arts and Creative Industries Division.Hall has also served as Vice President of Strategy and Organizational Development at Queens Library in New York City; at Boeing Company’s Global Corporate Citizenship Division where she worked as Community Investment Strategist and later as Chicago Community Investor; as Assistant Dean of Dominican University’s Graduate School of Library and Information Science; as Director of the Office for Diversity at the American Library Association; as visiting professor at Catholic, Southern Connecticut State, and Wesleyan Universities and in non-profit and public sector posts across the country.A recipient of various awards and residencies for her writing, creative and community work, Hall holds degrees from the University of California, Yale University and the University of Washington. She is Founding Curator of experimental arts space, Rootwork Gallery, and makes time to serve on various non-profit boards and committees.

Changing and Honoring the Narrative of Military Experience
Saturday, June 15, 1:45 pm - 3:00 pm

As the Forever War in Afghanistan continues, communities need to explore ways to help our returning Veterans reintegrate into their communities.  The Minnesota Humanities Center empowers Veterans from all conflicts and wars to speak in their own voices through plays, discussions, literature and Veterans’ Voices.  Writing Workshops are facilitated by military writers who are Veterans themselves, offering peer mentorship, instruction, and encouragement to those seeking to express the military experience through essays, poetry, and performance.

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Presenters
Blake Rondeau
Program Officer
Minnesota Humanities Center
St. Paul, Minnesota

Blake Rondeau has led the Minnesota Humanities Center’s statewide Veterans’ Voices programming since February 2018. In this capacity, Blake focuses on developing humanities programs and partnerships to address the civilian-veteran divide through dialogue and storytelling. Prior to joining the Humanities Center, he worked with the Minnesota Department of Veterans Affairs helping veterans navigate federal claims processes and connect to community resources. A United States Marine Corps veteran, he deployed to the Middle East in 2011 and discharged honorably in 2012. He has degrees in English and Communications (BA/MS University of St. Thomas).

James Moad II
War Literature and the Arts
Northfield, Minnesota

Jay Moad is a  former Air Force C-130 pilot with over 3000 flight hours and more than 100 combat sorties. He served as an English Professor at the United States Air Force Academy and continues to serve as an editor for their international journal, War, Literature & the Arts (WLA). His short stories, poetry and essays have appeared in a variety of journals and anthologies, and he is the recipient of the Consequence Magazine Fiction Award. In addition to writing, he has performed on stage at the Library of Congress and at The Guthrie Theater as part of The Telling Project - Giving Voice to the Veteran Experience. He wrote and performed in his play, "Outside Paducah - The Wars at Home" which debuted in the fall of 2017 in New York City at the Wild Project Theater for a three week run. He was nominated for the New York Innovative Theater Award (NYIT) for Outstanding Solo Performance. He currently resides in Northfield, MN.

New Policy Mechanisms to Further Equity
Saturday, June 15, 1:45 pm - 3:00 pm

Inclusion riders, community benefit agreements, artists rights—there are new ways of using policy in the pursuit of equity, but implementation can be murky. In this open dialogue, hear more about these mechanisms, and discuss how they can work for you.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn more about inclusion riders and how they can be mechanisms for equal pay and representation.
  2. Talk about community benefit agreements and other ways to ensure that a community's needs are considered as strongly as any other point of view.
  3. Explore the challenges of artists rights, copyright, and the careful balance required when working for a government agency or organization.

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Presenters
Luke Blackadar
Director of Legal Services
Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston
Boston, Massachusetts

As Director of Legal Services, Luke manages the Arts & Business Council’s Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts and Patent Pro Bono programs. As a visual artist and intellectual property attorney, he is passionate about serving small businesses and creatives. Luke has extensive experience counseling start-ups and creatives around the country in trademark, copyright, and business law matters. Previously, Luke was a business litigation associate at Donovan Hatem, LLP, and during law school he completed co-ops with the Cyber Crime and Intellectual Property Unit of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Massachusetts, former Chief Justice Ireland of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, and Prince Lobel Tye, LLP.  He regularly speaks on intellectual property and business law issues, giving presentations for organizations such as AIGA Boston, Boston SCORE, and Artpreneur.org.  He is a member of the Boston Bar Association, where he serves on the Solo & Small Firm Section steering committee.  Luke is a graduate of Clark University and Northeastern University School of Law.  In his spare time, he enjoys drawing, running, reading, and playing video games.

Sarah Rucker
Founder
Full Gallop
Austin, Texas

Sarah is a lifelong arts advocate with over 12 years of experience in arts research, programming and presenting. She is the founder of Full Gallop, which offers event production, community engagement and artist consulting services. Full Gallop strives to bridge cultures and connect communities through creative collaborations and programs. She has a personal mission to help increase equity in the arts, especially in Austin, where she recently started the Inclusion Riders Initiative ATX.

Recognizing and Dismantling Inequitable Default Systems
Saturday, June 15, 1:45 pm - 3:00 pm

Systems, by and large, do a great job of fulfilling the goal they were built for--so if you're experiencing an inequitable outcome, it's likely because your organization's default systems are inequitable. These inequities can be almost impossible to see and are difficult to dismantle. So how do you do it?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Hear how to search for and identify default systems that advantage privileged groups within your organization.
  2. Discuss tips for bringing systemic issues up and for building momentum to change them.
  3. Talk about some of the primary default assumptions of the non-profit model, the grantmaking model, and other core ways of working that are built on inequitable systems.

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Presenters
Margie Johnson Reese
Executive Director
Wichita Fall Alliance for Arts and Culture
Wichita Falls, Texas

Margie Johnson Reese has a 35-year portfolio as an arts advocate and arts management professional. She received a BA from Washington State University in Pullman, Washington and an MFA in Theater from Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. She recently relocated to Wichita Falls, Texas to create The Wichita Falls Alliance for Arts and Culture, a new local arts agency grounded in policies and practices that advance inclusion and pubic participation in the arts.
 

Margie has served as Director of the Office of Cultural Affairs for the City of Dallas and General Manager for the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs. Margie’s expertise as a grantmaker was tapped by the Ford Foundation to advance cultural projects in West Africa. Based in Lagos, Nigeria, her 3-year appointment centered on cultural policy development and conservation of West Africa’s tangible and intangible cultural heritage.


Following her service in West Africa, Margie returned to Dallas and took the position of Vice President for Programs at Big Thought, an arts learning organization.

Rebecca Kinslow
Community & Organizational Development Director
Metro Arts/Nashville's Office of Arts & Culture
Nashville, Tennessee

Rebecca Kinslow is the Community & Organizational Development Director and a member of the executive leadership team for Metro Arts, Nashville’s Office of Arts & Culture. With over 20 years of experience as an arts leader, she has specialized in event-planning, marketing, community development, grantmaking, program management and organizational development in the non-profit, higher education and government sectors. 

Kinslow leads the development, strategic planning and oversight of programs, partnerships and financial investments designed to support stronger arts & cultural organizations in Nashville. She oversees a $2.5 million annual public grant investment program, cultural and racial equity strategy, community arts programming and a wide network of local and national partnerships that expand the mission of Metro Arts to drive a vibrant and equitable community through the arts.  She holds an Executive Certificate in Arts & Cultural Strategy and a M.S. in Nonprofit Leadership from University of Pennsylvania. She serves on Americans for the Arts’ County Arts Network and Equitable Investments Advisory Committee, the Create Justice Network Peer Learning Action Group, the Program Advisory Committee for the Arts & Business Council of Greater Nashville and the Government Alliance for Racial Equity Arts Workgroup.

Encouraging Arts-And Lenses in Corporate Giving Programs
Saturday, June 15, 4:45 pm - 6:00 pm

Encouraging arts-related investment from corporations means helping corporate giving officers connect the dots between the arts and other non-arts areas where corporations dedicate their funding. Your peers will share winning strategies and tactics in this discussion session.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain casemaking tools and strategies related to arts-and conversations with corporate representatives.
  2. Learn how to adapt your language to anchor it in the non-arts strategic pillars of corporate prospects.
  3. See how corporations and CSR program officers have connected the arts to other philanthropy giving.

#aftacon

Presenters
Christen Boone
President & CEO
Fund for the Arts
Louisville, Kentucky

Christen McDonough Boone is the President & CEO of the Fund for the Arts, building a stronger, more vibrant community through the Arts. Founded in 1949, Fund for the Arts is the regional arts agency and the largest funder of the arts in the Greater Louisville region.  The Fund raises $9 million annually through a united arts campaign, drives arts access, education and innovation throughout the region, and supports more than 100 organizations, artists and initiatives.  Before joining the Fund for the Arts, Christen served in leadership roles for some of the country’s most treasured cultural institutions.  She has raised more than $250 million for regional nonprofit organizations, including Actors Theatre of Louisville, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Cincinnati’s Fine Arts Fund, and The Parklands of Floyds Fork, one of the nation’s largest new urban parks.  She served as Director of the Greater Louisville Project and founded the Boone Group, coaching and consulting in nonprofit and community development.  Christen serves as the Chair of the national Private Sector Council for the Americans for the Arts, and locally on the board of Greater Louisville Inc., Louisville Downtown Partnership, Center for Nonprofit Excellence, Arts and Cultural Alliance, the Governors Scholars Program and chairs the GSP Foundation.

Jessica Stern
Private Sector Initiatives Programs Manager
Americans for the Arts
New York, New York

Jessica joined Americans for the Arts as the Private Sector Initiatives Program Manager in January 2018. Before relocating to New York to join Americans for the Arts, Jessica acted as the Membership and Resources Manager for the Nonprofit Association of Oregon (NAO), providing oversight of NAO’s statewide membership program while curating and reinventing its online platform of nonprofit management best practice resources. Prior to NAO, Jessica spent nearly five years working with Portland’s local business committee for the arts, Business for Culture & the Arts (BCA), delivering programs that engaged employees from BCA’s 200+ business members, managing all marketing and communications strategies, and retaining and cultivating corporate and community partnerships. Jessica has also served in development roles at Metropolitan Youth Symphony and Literary Arts; and has freelanced as an independent web designer and developer.

Jessica graduated from Portland State University with Master’s in Public Administration with a Certificate in Nonprofit Management and from Lewis & Clark College with a BA in Ethnomusicology and French Studies. She co-founded Portland Emerging Arts Leaders and helped design and grow its emerging leader mentorship program. Aside from thinking about creating an ever-vibrant arts community, Jessica enjoys cycling, hiking, cooking and listening to music from all over the world.
 

How Does Arts Education Fit in the School Choice Policy Landscape?
Saturday, June 15, 4:45 pm - 6:00 pm

With increased national attention on school choice, arts champions are left to wonder where the arts can fit into school choice policy. This Long Table session is an open discussion about the policy, research, and implications of school choice on arts education access.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Leave with a new understanding of how arts education fits into the school choice policy landscape.
  2. Connect with others in the arts edcuation field.
  3. Explore a significant trend in arts education policy at an inflection moment.

#aftacon

Presenters
Jane Best
Director
Arts Education Partnership
Denver, Colorado

Jane Best is the Director of the Arts Education Partnership at Education Commission of the States in Denver, CO.  Dr. Best has extensive experience working among practitioners, policymakers and researchers. She previously held leadership positions at McREL International, Learning Point Associates (now American Institutes for Research) and the National Conference of State Legislatures. She started her career in education as a high school French and ESL teacher in Columbus, Ohio.  Jane chairs the Windgate Advisory Board at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art and has served on the board of directors of Knowledge Alliance and the STEM Education Coalition, trade associations that advocate for federal funding for education research and development.   Dr. Best also served on the board of governors for the College of Education at The Ohio State University.  Jane holds a Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University.

Mary Dell'Erba
Project Manager
Arts Education Partnership
Washington, District of Columbia

As a project manager for the Arts Education Partnership, Mary focuses on STEAM initiatives and the intersection of school choice and arts education. Prior to joining Education Commission of the States, she worked for the Arts Education in Maryland Schools Alliance, where she served in a variety of capacities in programming, administration and policy. Mary received her Master's in Public Policy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. With over 20 years of dance training, Mary is passionate about the arts and education. 

Racial Equity in Local Arts Agencies
Saturday, June 15, 4:45 pm - 6:00 pm

Local arts agencies are leading the way in terms of equity in arts and culture. This session share findings from six case studies of LAAs doing notable work on racial equity, as well as findings related to equity from the 2018 LAA Profile.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explore promising practices that LAAs are employing to advance equity in arts and culture.
  2. Learn more about what the broad LAA field is doing, and what progress has occurred in the last 3 years.
  3. Discuss the challenges of doing equity work in arts and culture in municipal settings.

#aftacon

Presenters
Barbara Mumby-Huerta
Director, Community Investments
San Francisco Arts Commission
San Francisco, California

Barbara Mumby-Huerta was born and raised in California’s Central Valley, where her family’s Native American heritage and work as migrant farmers greatly influenced her passion for social justice and equity issues. As Director of Community Investments at the San Francisco Arts Commission, Barbara oversees the Cultural Equity grants program, the Cultural Center Special Fund, the Arts Impact Endowment, Arts Education, and the Street Artist Licensing Program. Annually, she leads the distribution of approximately $11 million dollars to small and mid-sized arts non-profits, individual artists and teaching artists. Prior to joining SFAC, Barbara designed and implemented large-scale early childhood education initiatives and grant programs in both Alameda and Merced County through their respective First 5 organizations. She has also worked as a curator, teaching artist and visual artist working in various mediums such as textiles, metal, wood and clay.

Barbara obtained her undergraduate degrees in Native American Studies and Studio Arts from the University of California Berkeley and Master’s degrees in Museum Studies and Business Administration from the John F Kennedy University. Her research focus has been on the international repatriation of Native American cultural property in relation to healing historical trauma. She is passionate in her support for Indigenous communities in their fight for self-determination and has worked at the grass roots level around environmental and incarceration issues.   

Cultivating Influencers into Allies
Sunday, June 16, 9:00 am - 10:30 am

How do you strategically develop and maintain relationships with local influential artists, officials, and private sector leaders and leverage their power over time across multiple platforms and programs? In this panel, hear about how such alliances start and succeed, and why they're crucial.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn strategies for cultivating influencers into allies and supporters, and maintaining their engagement over time.
  2. Explore some of the challenges of influencer cultivation, including issues of time and resources.
  3. Think about how to bridge friendship and cultivation.

#aftacon

Dismantling Racially-Driven Barriers to the Creative Economy
Sunday, June 16, 9:00 am - 10:30 am

Like many other systems derived from white/capitalist concepts, success in the creative economy is harder for people who create, work, lead, and communicate differently from dominant norms. In this discussion, break down what those norms are and how agencies and local partners can address them.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Hear from members of historically marginalized groups about their ways of working, and how they have attempted to succeed in the creative economy.
  2. Explore examples of how agencies and local public and private partners have worked to address barriers and dismantle inequitable systems.
  3. Learn more about dominant (white, male, heteronormative) frames and how they appear in the creative economy.

#aftacon

Presenters
Eric Jolly
President & CEO
Saint Paul & Minnesota Foundation
St. Paul, Minnesota

In his role as president and chief executive officer of The Saint Paul & Minnesota Foundations, Eric J. Jolly, Ph.D., continues his lifelong work to educate, elevate, and give voice to people in his communities.


The Saint Paul & Minnesota Foundations match donors’ charitable resources with community-led solutions. Jolly began leading The Foundations in August 2015 and is forging meaningful, lasting partnerships with donors and members of the community to create a stronger, healthier and more equitable Minnesota.


Before joining the Foundations, Jolly was president of the Science Museum of Minnesota for a decade.


Jolly came to Saint Paul after serving as vice president and senior scientist at the Education Development Center in Massachusetts. Before that he worked as a professor and administrative leader in successive academic roles.

Interactive

The Interactive format is a freer format session designed to break people out of their more traditional ways of engaging. One to two moderators oversee this session, which can range from broad brainstorming to interactive exercises.
Newcomers and New-at-Heart Meet-and-Greet
Friday, June 14, 10:00 am - 11:30 am

First time at the Annual Convention, or simply want to meet new people in a casual, fun environment? Join us for the Newcomers and New-at-Heart Meet-and-Greet to find a conference buddy, meet rising talent, and get your energy going before the conference kicks off!

Learning Objectives:

  1. Meet new people!
  2. Learn more about what the Annual Convention is, who attends, and explore the schedule of events.
  3. Pick up some new ice-breaker exercises to take back home.

#aftacon

Presenters
Aileen Alon
Program Manager
Venture Cafe Miami
North Miami, Florida
@aileenalon


Aileen is fueled by a passion for building creative, sustainable, inclusive, and engaged communities. She is currently the Program Manager for Venture CafĂ© Miami, where she curates programming and partnerships to strengthen connections, creativity, and collaborations between diverse innovators, entrepreneurs, and others seeking to create positive change in their communities. In addition, Aileen has done consulting around cultural arts and creative placemaking. She previously spent seven years spearheading the integration of the arts and culture into neighborhood revitalization strategies for the Opa-locka Community Development Corporation, which was named a case study in for best practices in creative placemaking and community development by the National Endowment for the Art’s Exploring Our Town Program in 2013. Aileen is active on several boards and committees geared towards civic engagement, culture, and leadership development.

Todd Trebour
Organizations Program Director
Rhode Island State Council on the Arts
Providence, Rhode Island

Todd is the Organizations Program Director the Rhode Island State Council (RISCA) on the Arts, where he manages and oversees the agency’s support for organizations, including granting programs, professional development support for arts administrations, and local and regional network-building.

Prior to RISCA, Todd was the Program Coordinator for the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service (AES). Through his work at AES, Todd helped artists and arts students build vibrant careers and businesses through arts management and arts entrepreneurship courses, trainings, and programming, both on-campus, regionally, and online. Before working with AES, Todd was the marketing and development director at Chester Theatre Company (CTC), a professional summer theatre company in the mountain town of Chester, MA.

Todd has also worked as a professional operatic performer and concert soloist, performing with companies throughout the United States and Canada. Todd received his BA in Music Performance from Whitman College, his MM in Voice from Rice University, and his Core Certificate in Arts Management from the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service. Currently, Todd is in his second term on the Emerging Leaders Advisory Council at Americans for the Arts.

Incorporating Mindfulness in Your Organization
Friday, June 14, 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Mindfulness is incorporated today across industries including healthcare, education, business, professional sports, and law enforcement. This session explores how mindfulness in the work place cultivates empathy, supports well-being, and is essential to supporting interpersonal engagement and leadership.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn new ways to remain focused, calm, kind, and clear in challenging environments.
  2. Cultivate greater self-awareness and the ability to be more aware of others.
  3. Get an overview of the latest research on mindfulness.

#aftacon

Perfecting Your Escalator Pitch
Friday, June 14, 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

There's nothing so terrifying as working out all the details of a proposal for months, and then having just minutes to make the case for it to a funder or decisionmaker. In this interactive session, learn the fundamentals of the perfect pitch, and then pair up and practice on the escalators of the Hilton Minneapolis!

Learning Objectives:

  1. Work out how to pare down your big, amazing, detailed project into its essence.
  2. Practice your presentation, and get in-the-moment, honest feedback.
  3. Leave with a plan on developing the perfect, concise presentation.

#aftacon

Presenters
Shannon Daut
Manager of Cultural Affairs
City of Santa Monica
Santa Monica, California

Shannon leads the Cultural Affairs Division for the City of Santa Monica, where she works to integrate the arts into all aspects of life in the community. She was previously the Executive Director of the Alaska State Council on the Arts. While there, she re-imagined and re-invigorated the leadership role of the agency in state policy, from tourism and economic development to education and Alaska Native cultural advancement. Prior to moving to Alaska, Daut was Deputy Director of the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF), where she oversaw the organization's work in the areas of cultural policy and technology. Daut has served on the boards of the National Performance Network/Visual Arts Network, the Association of Performing Arts Presenters and WESTAF. Daut received her bachelor's degree in Communication Arts/Film from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her graduate degree in Communication/Rhetoric from the University of Colorado-Denver.

Spectacular Failures!
Saturday, June 15, 1:45 pm - 3:00 pm

What are the projects, ideas, and concepts this past year that were amazing in theory but ended up as spectacular failures? This interactive session will feature some audacious and energizing failures through a framework that makes sure today's failures drive tomorrow's successes.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Celebrate the effort and progress that goes into, and comes out of, even the biggest failures.
  2. Think through how to recover and learn from failures.
  3. Share and learn about coping strategies, iteration, self-care, and incremental evaluation to find the successes inside failures.

#aftacon

Presenters
Felicia Shaw
Executive Director
Regional Arts Commission of St. Louis
Saint Louis, Missouri

Felicia W. Shaw has served as the executive director of the Regional Arts Commission of St. Louis since 2015, where she brings nearly 30 years of experience in arts administration and nonprofit leadership to the position. Previously, she served for eight years as Director of Arts and Culture Strategy and Analysis at the San Diego Foundation overseeing programs that connected donors to the work of individual artists and arts groups in the nonprofit sector.  Prior to joining the San Diego Foundation, Felicia was Program Manager at the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture. Her work included the implementation of a diverse portfolio of grantmaking programs and initiatives focusing on community and economic development through the arts. She shares her expertise on several national and local boards including the Americans for the Arts United States Urban Arts Federation, St Louis Community Foundation and FOCUS St Louis. Recent awards include the “Mathews Dickey Boys and Girls Club – Arts Advocate Award” (2015); and the San Diego Magazine “Women who Mean Business” Award (2012). Felicia is a graduate of Northwestern University with a B.S. degree in Communications.

Session(s): 

Lightning Round

The Lightning Round format is an opportunity for attendees to hear concise, results- and replication-oriented presentations on innovations happening in the arts and culture field across the United States. It features one moderator and a number of attendees, each of whom will be allotted a strictly-limited seven minutes to present a PowerPoint-based presentation.
Evaluation Round-Up
Friday, June 14, 4:30 am - 6:00 pm

So popular we brought it back! Check out lightning-fast presentations on evaluation projects from the past year! This is a great opportunity to hear and see the latest techiques, tips, and learnings on how to evaluate your work.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Catch up on some of the big evaluation projects from the arts field in the last year.
  2. Compare and contrast the projects, and discuss how they're applicable to you.
  3. Discuss how to make sure evaluation becomes a standard part of every project you do.

#aftacon

Presenters
Anne Katz
Executive Director
Arts Wisconsin
Madison, Wisconsin

Anne Katz is executive director of Arts Wisconsin, Wisconsin’s community cultural development organization, whose mission is to nurture, serve, promote, and speak up for the arts in Wisconsin and all of its communities.  She guides Arts Wisconsin’s programs and activities, serves Wisconsin’s diverse and ever-expanding creative community, and advocates and builds partnerships in the public and private sectors for the arts and creative industries on the local level. Anne was an Arts Administration Fellow at the National Endowment for the Arts in 1988, and was a member of the 2014-2015 class of National Arts Strategies’ Chief Executive Program, a global leadership program focused on community cultural development. Under her leadership, Arts Wisconsin received the 2004 Governor’s Award in Support of the Arts from the Wisconsin Foundation for the Arts.   Anne has received the Alene Valkanas Arts Advocacy Award from Americans for the Arts, the “Service to Music” Award from the Association of Wisconsin Symphony Orchestras, and the Wisconsin Visual Art Achievement Award.  Anne serves on the board of directors of the Wisconsin Public Radio Association, Leadership Wisconsin, and the Wisconsin Downtown Action Council.

Session(s): 
Divya Rao Heffley
Associate Director
Office of Public Art
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Divya Rao Heffley is an arts professional with over ten years of experience in museums, public art, and programming. A Pittsburgh native, she developed a love affair with cities early on that led her to pursue a PhD at Brown University on the intersections between urban design, architecture, and spatial perception. A commitment to the critical role of the arts in the urban experience brought Divya back to Carnegie Museum of Art, where she managed the Hillman Photography Initiative from 2011-2017. An advocate of equity in the arts, she launched artist commissions and public programming that addressed a range of contemporary issues, seeking to foster social justice and cultural equity in public, gallery, and online spaces. 


Divya has juried Photolucida’s Critical Mass International Photography Competition and the Magenta Foundation’s Flash Forward Emerging Photographers Competition, and reviewed at CENTER Santa Fe’s REVIEW Santa Fe. Divya’s writing has appeared in Museums and Visitor Photography; Museum Ideas: Innovation in Theory and Practice, v.2; Design and Culture; Carnegie Magazine; and the Center for the Future of Museums blog. Divya holds a PhD in the History of Art and Architecture from Brown University and a BA in the History of Art from Yale University.

Session(s): 
Research Round-Up
Saturday, June 15, 1:45 pm - 3:00 pm

The annual tradition continues with lightning-fast research summaries from some of the best new research of the year! This is a can't-miss selection of new arts research!

Learning Objectives:

  1. Hear disparate new research about creative placemaking, creative economy, public art, arts education, social impact, and more!
  2. Explore interconnections with the presenters, and brainstorm what the findings mean to your work.
  3. Learn about upcoming trends and research.

#aftacon

Presenters
Anne Gadwa Nicodemus
CEO & Principal
Metris Arts Consulting
Easton, Pennsylvania

A choreographer/arts administrator turned urban planner, Anne Gadwa Nicodemus leads Metris’ work. She founded Metris in 2009, oversees its strategic direction and daily operations and also frequently serves as a lead technical contributor on Metris’ projects. Nicodemus brings over 10 years of experience as a researcher, writer, speaker, and advocate whose work focuses on arts-based community development. Nicodemus co-authored Creative Placemaking, the report for the Mayors’ Institute of City Design (2010) that helped define the field. Her book chapters and journal articles “Creative placemaking: Reflections on a 21st-century American arts policy initiative” (Creative Placemaking: Research, Theory and Practice, 2019), “Fuzzy Vibrancy” (Cultural Trends, 2013) and “Creative Placemaking: How to do it Well” (Community Development Investment Review, 2014) look more deeply at creative placemaking as cultural policy and its ethics and practical challenges. Nicodemus speaks widely on creative placemaking at universities and professional conferences nationwide, and as far-flung as Macau, the Czech Republic, and Ontario. Since 2012, she has been recognized as one of the nation’s 50 most influential people in the nonprofit arts in WESTAF’s annual peer-nominated list. Nicodemus holds a Master of Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Minnesota and a B.A. from Oberlin College.

Session(s): 
Brenda Kayzar
Owner & Collaborative Strategist
Urban Drk Consulting
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Dr. Brenda Kayzar is the Collaborative Strategist and owner of Urbane DrK Consulting where she provides research, strategic planning and advocacy leadership support to government and nonprofit organizations. Brenda’s practice is focused on addressing wider economic and social concerns through research based strategies, informed by community.  She facilitates equitable, sustainable, and achievable outcomes for her clients, applying a hybrid of experience from academia, business, and nonprofit leadership.  Brenda has authored works in academic and local presses exploring the economic, political and social contexts of urban change through such lenses as revitalization policy, the creative placemaking paradigm, and gentrification and development impacts to lower-income neighborhoods, communities of color, and the creative sector.  Brenda is regularly in service to civic committees and working groups and she serves on community and nonprofit boards such as the Northeast Minneapolis Arts Association and the Arts and Cultural Leadership Program at University of Minnesota.

Session(s): 
Claire de Boer
Director, Humanistic Medicine, Arts in Health
Penn State College of Medicine and PSH Hershey Medical Center
Hershey, Pennsylvania

Claire de Boer holds a BS in Human Development and Family Studies from Cornell University and an MS in Global and International Education from Drexel University.  She has led arts and education programs in Ithaca, New York, mid-coast Maine and Rotterdam, the Netherlands.  In 2011, Claire fused her storyline into one culminating project: to found an Arts in Health organization in a large medical center. She has since developed great reverence for the magic of the performing, visual and participatory arts toward health and wellbeing. Claire is a founding board member of the National Organization of Arts in Health (NOAH). She is passionate about NOAH’s initiatives, particularly to “walk the walk” regarding Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; to develop credentialing for professional artists in health; and to grow the research base that measures the impact of the arts on health. Besides her work, her passions are open water swimming, long-distance cycling, yoga, ensemble music, languages and fiber-arts.

Session(s): 
Randy Cohen
Vice President of Research and Policy
Americans for the Arts
Washington, District of Columbia

Randy Cohen is Vice President of Research and Policy at Americans for the Arts, the nation's leading arts advocacy organization. A member of the staff since 1991, Randy stands out as a noted expert in the field of arts funding, research, and using the arts to address community development issues. He publishes Americans Speak Out About the Arts, the nation’s largest public opinion study about the arts, and produces the two premier economic studies of the arts—Arts & Economic Prosperity, the national economic impact study of nonprofit arts organizations and their audiences; and Creative Industries, a mapping study of the nation’s 675,000 arts businesses and their employees. His 10 Reasons to Support the Arts blog recently received the Gold Award from the Association of Media & Publishing—their top honor for best blog post of the year.  Randy led the development of The National Arts Index, the annual measure of the health and vitality of arts in the U.S. as well as the National Arts Policy Roundtable, an annual convening of leaders who focus on the advancement of American culture—launched in partnership with Robert Redford and the Sundance Institute. A sought-after speaker, Randy has given speeches in all 50 states, and regularly appears in the news media—including the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and on C-SPAN, CNN, CNBC, and NPR.

Session(s): 

Threads Sessions

Each Threads Session is 40 minutes long, and is meant as an opportunity for the AFTA staffmember to facilitate reflection and connection about the Convention learning experiences of those in the room.
Emerging Leaders Thread
Sunday, June 16, 9:00 am - 9:45 am

Sign up for your topic-specific FREE Threads when you register! Join with your peers in this special close-out session to discuss what you have seen and learned at the 2019 Annual Convention!

#aftacon

Rural Thread
Sunday, June 16, 9:00 am - 9:45 am

Sign up for your topic-specific FREE Threads when you register! Join with your peers in this special close-out session to discuss what you have seen and learned at the 2019 Annual Convention!

#aftacon

Arts Education Thread
Sunday, June 16, 9:45 am - 10:30 am

Sign up for your topic-specific FREE Threads when you register! Join with your peers in this special close-out session to discuss what you have seen and learned at the 2019 Annual Convention!

#aftacon

Mid-Career Thread
Sunday, June 16, 9:45 am - 10:30 am

Sign up for your topic-specific FREE Threads when you register! Join with your peers in this special close-out session to discuss what you have seen and learned at the 2019 Annual Convention!

#aftacon

Panel

The Panel format is the most traditional format at Convention. It features a moderator and 3-4 panelists, who sit on a raised stage with microphones and the ability to give PowerPoint presentations. The moderator, who will also participate as a presenter, threads the presentations together and leads a Q&A at the end.
Meet and Ask the National Endowment for the Arts
Friday, June 14, 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

An annual favorite returns! In addition to details on the various grant programs of the National Endowment for the Arts, come learn about new national initiatives, technical assistance tools, and other relevant resources.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain detailed understanding of the various NEA grant opportunities, categories, and deadlines.
  2. Learn more about current national initiatives, as well as how to access technical assistance and resources.
  3. Get an introduction to other non-NEA federal resources relevant to your work.

#aftacon

Presenters
Lara Holman Garritano
Local Arts Agencies Specialists
National Endowment for the Arts
Washington, District of Columbia

Lara Holman Garritano currently serves as the Local Arts Agencies Specialist for the National Endowment for the Arts, managing funding opportunities available to the more than 4,500 Local Arts Agencies across the country. With over 20 years of experience in the field, Lara has worked on arts and culture policy and programming in a variety of communities and capacities. Previously, Lara was the Creative District Manager for downtown Colorado Springs in Colorado. In working to obtain a state-certified creative district designation, Lara developed and managed programming that integrated arts and creativity into downtown’s economic and livability efforts. Prior to that, Lara served at 4Culture, a local arts agency in Seattle, Washington, in positions that ranged from managing grant funding programs to addressing agency-wide priorities as the organization’s first Communications lead. Lara has a Bachelor of Arts in Art History from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington.

Using Arts-And Communication Frames to Increase Public Value
Friday, June 14, 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

A growing body of research shows the arts create powerful and positive change across many sectors, from infrastructure to social justice and diplomacy. Now, Americans for the Arts and partners are working to communicate this value to shape public perceptions. In this session, learn more about what helps people make those connections and join your side.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Hear the results of a pilot research project on how communications framing works on arts and health issues.
  2. Discuss the benefits and challenges of arts-and argumentation for affecting public perceptions of value.
  3. Talk through next steps, possibilities for future work, and ways you might use such work in your community.

#aftacon

Presenters
Margy Waller
Senior Fellow
Topos Partnership
Cincinnati, Ohio
@margyartgrrl


Margy Waller is a Senior Fellow at Topos Partnership (a national strategic communications organization), founder and Serendipity Director of Art on the Streets, and was a leader in the transformation of ArtsWave, an arts advocacy and support non-profit. She has served as advisor on national initiatives to Americans for the Arts, LISC, ArtPlace, Kresge Foundation, PolicyLink, and others.


Previously she was Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, with a joint appointment in the Economic Studies and Metropolitan Policy programs. Prior to Brookings, she was Senior Advisor on domestic policy in the Clinton-Gore White House. Before joining the Administration, Margy was Senior Fellow for Social Policy and Director of the Working Families Project at the Progressive Policy Institute. She also served as Director of Public Policy at United Way of America, and Director of Policy Development at Public/Private Ventures in Philadelphia. In 2010, Margy was named one of the nation's 25 most "powerful and influential" nonprofit arts leaders and she comments on arts, community, and strategic communications on twitter: @margyartgrrl and her ArtsJournal blog, The Bright Ride. Waller is a graduate of Northwestern University and The Ohio State University College of Law.

Susannah Laramee Kidd
Senior Researcher
Metris Arts Consulting
Easton, Pennsylvania

Susannah Laramee Kidd, an ethnographer turned evaluator and arts and culture policy researcher, is Senior Researcher for Metris Arts Consulting. Prior to joining Metris, Laramee Kidd has worked as an independent arts and culture research consultant, as well as Research Analyst and Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow at the Los Angeles County Arts Commission. As an independent consultant, she wrote a brief guide for evaluators and researchers on the “Aesthetic Perspectives: Attributes of Excellence for Arts for Change” framework published by Animating Democracy in 2017. As a Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow at the Arts Commission, she produced a report titled "Art as Infrastructure" as part of her evaluation of public art, social practice, and public engagement projects at parks and libraries in unincorporated LA County neighborhoods. She also supported work at the Arts Commission in cultural equity and inclusion and public grantmaking in the arts.


Laramee Kidd holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology of Religion and Literature and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies from Emory University. Her academic research focused on how religious communities and individuals make meaning through everyday imaginative/aesthetic practices, like reading in discussion groups, and she continues to be interested in the interplay between the social and aesthetic dimensions of meaning-making.

Mapping Arts Education to Pursue Both Policy and Equity
Friday, June 14, 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Check out new interactive mapping tools for the field of arts education designed to make the work of arts and culture organizations and individual teaching artists more visible. Take some lives tours, and a talk on the implications for the arts education field.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how these new digital asset mapping resources work and how you can use them.
  2. Explore how such resources create an understanding of equitable access to the arts across regions.
  3. Discuss how these mapping efforts resonate with public and private sector policy pursuits for arts education.

#aftacon

Presenters
Paul Sznewajs
Executive Director
Ingenuity
Chicago, Illinois

Paul Sznewajs is founding Executive Director of Ingenuity, which has driven the most arts education progress in Chicago schools in nearly four decades. Ingenuity received the 2013 Chicago Innovation Award as one of the city’s ten most innovative companies. Paul also received Boeing’s 2013 Game Changer Award, cited as the city’s arts and cultural leader who effected greatest change in the sector that year.

He is currently leading the implementation of a groundbreaking arts data and mapping platform with growing national implications. Paul has a track record of building, launching, and evaluating complex cultural social sector initiatives.

His professional experience spans executive leadership; public-sector planning and capacity building; grant-making and impact investment program design; designing and implementing large-scale public-private initiatives: program development; and metric-based outcomes and program analysis.

As a chief fundraiser, strategist, creative director, and arts advocate, he has been honored by the White House and the President’s Committee for the Arts and Humanities for his work, and is a long-standing leader in Chicago’s arts and culture sector.

What Are DEI-Related Affinity Groups, and Why are they Useful?
Saturday, June 15, 9:00 am - 9:45 am

An Affinity Group is a group of faculty and staff linked by a common purpose, ideology, or interest—but what are they for? How do they work? What should you know before considering starting one in your organization or community?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn more about diversity/equity/inclusion-related Affinity Groups and how they work, and how to make sure they're productive and positive components of your organization.
  2. Discuss the concept of "white space" and other dominant frameworks that pervade most spaces, and how Affinity Groups address such frameworks.
  3. Explore how to engage with those who find affinity groups uncomfortable.

#aftacon

Presenters
Quanice G. Floyd
Founder & Director
Arts Administrators of Color Network
Washington, District of Columbia

Quanice G. Floyd is a renaissance woman who wears many capes. Born and raised in NYC, she has spent over a decade in Washington, DC where she has received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Music Educationfrom Howard University and Kent State University respectively. Her passion for arts administration led her to pursue her second Master’s degree in Arts Management at American University and is currently a doctoral student at Drexel University. Quanice is also the Founder & Director of the Arts Administrators of Color Network, an organization committed to empowering artists and arts administrators by advocating for access, diversity, inclusion, and equity in the arts in the DC and Baltimore metropolitan areas. For the past decade, she has been a public-school music educator where she taught elementary school general music, chorus, band, and orchestra. Quanice also serves as a board member for two DC arts organizations, and is an alumna of ArtEquity's Racial Facilitator Cohort, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra’s Music Educators and Arts Administrators Academy, 4.0 Schools' Essentials Program, and the Arts Education Collaborative’s Leadership Academy. In 2018, Quanice was honored with the American Express Emerging Leader Award by Americans for the Arts.

4 Common Business Challenges and How the Arts Can Address Them
Saturday, June 15, 1:45 pm - 3:00 pm

This panel session will feature business and arts leaders as they discuss four common challenges businesses of all sizes face as they seek to create a competitive edge and explore how the arts can be leveraged to address them. Explore talent attraction, retention and engagement; creative problem solving, productivity and innovation; advancing DEI initiatives in business, and company brand awareness.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the most universally pressing business challenges that the arts are poised to address and understand the shared benefits of collaborative solutions.
  2. Hear case studies of successful business/arts partnerships and why they succeeded.
  3. Learn how to draw on your core competencies and programming to create mutually beneficial partnerships.

#aftacon

Localizing Social Impact Decisionmaker Education
Saturday, June 15, 4:45 pm - 6:00 pm

Many of the best social impact-related research and arguments for increasing support for arts and culture require hyper-localization—local examples andtools, and personalized information. How do we make that happen? In this session, hear about a "social impact census," the localization of a national tool, how national data integrates with local examples, and more!

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the intersectionality of social impact work, and why it is key to improving both public value and decisionmaker support for arts and culture.
  2. Learn about accessible examples and replicable resources for making social impact arguments in your community.
  3. Discover how social impact creates community change and encourages consideration of equity.

#aftacon

Presenters
Maud Lyon
President
Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Maud Lyon leads the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance, an advocacy organization that supports arts and culture in five counties through research, marketing, and professional support for nonprofits.  The Alliance has 440 member organizations, from history to science to horticulture to visual and performing arts, representing grassroots organizations and major cultural institutions in five counties of Pennsylvania and northern Delaware and southern New Jersey.  The Alliance’s work centers upon advocacy, bringing resources to arts and culture; and audience engagement, connecting the public to opportunities for learning, creativity, social interaction and discovery at museums, performing arts, community art centers and many other forms of arts and culture.   Increasing diversity and equity in arts and culture is a major initiative, to make arts and culture organizations more inclusive and to support greater appreciation for diversity for the public.

Place-Based Experiments in Intercultural Leadership Development
Saturday, June 15, 4:45 pm - 6:00 pm

Explore how systems can move towards cultural equity with leadership and training opportunities for people of color through four impactful programs: the Intercultural Leadership Institute, the Multicultural Arts Leadership Institute, the Diversity in Arts Leadership program, and the Urban Futures Lab.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about the motivations for these leadership development programs for emergent creative leaders of color.
  2. Explore how these programs can build capacity and skills centered on a recognition of systemic inequity community empowerment.
  3. Discuss how these programs use leadership development in the arts to connect with residents, government, and non-arts sectors.

#aftacon

Presenters
Demone Carter
Program Manager
The School of Arts and Culture @ MHP
San Jose, California

Demone Carter is an award-winning Hip Hop artist and creative catalyst who works to foster inclusion within San Jose’s arts ecosystem. In his current role as Program Manager for the School of Arts and Culture at MHP’s Multicultural Arts Leadership Insitute (MALI) he is tasked with leading a cohort-based arts leadership program for arts professionals of color deeply engaged in Silicon Valley’s arts, culture, and entertainment sectors. Demone is a MALI Alum and member of MALI Class Four.
 
Before joining the School of Arts and Culture Demone co-founded FutureArtsNow!  a for-profit venture that seeks to fill the void left by vanishing school arts programs through the medium of authentic hip hop dance. FutureArtsNow! has received recognition from San Jose Job Corps and the City of San Jose.
 
Performing under the name DEM ONE he has released several albums, been named Silicon Valley Artist Laureate (2016), and recently participated in a cultural exchange musical tour of Vietnam in conjunction with the U.S. Embassy in Hanoi.
 
In addition to recording and performing Demone is also the host of the Dad Bod Rap Pod podcast and writes about music, culture, and race for Content Magazine, SV De Bug, and San Jose.

Mike Blockstein
Principal
Public Matters
Los Angeles, California

Mike Blockstein is a visual artist and educator with a long track record of expanding the boundaries of the arts. He is Principal of Public Matters, a Los Angeles social enterprise and creative studio for civic engagement that uses socially engaged art to leverage greater inclusion, public participation and transformative change. His work addresses art’s role in civic life, working with diverse groups and institutions of varying scale to reflect on, understand and shape their physical, social and political geographies.


Mike developed and co-leads Public Matters’ leadership development initiative, Urban Futures Lab, a two-year paid fellowship for young adults of color ages 18-26. The Lab is part on-the-job training, part professional development, part network-building and 100% community-focused. Fellows are trained to be multidisciplinary, creative community problem solvers and catalysts for change.


Underscoring his cross-sector work, Mike is a rare visual artist with a Masters of Public Administration from Harvard’s Kennedy School. He spends his days bringing together professionals from public health, urban planning, and transportation to work with high school students, Fellows and artists on placed-based projects that transform the culture, practice and experience of civic participation in communities of color. 

Turning Lessons Learned into Action Steps for Disaster Preparedness
Sunday, June 16, 9:00 am - 10:30 am

No community’s recovery from disaster is complete without the full recovery of its arts and culture sector.  Artists and arts organizations affected are usually the last to receive financial assistance, yet the first to be called upon to initiate the community’s healing process. In this session, hear about how you can get ahead of disasters, with hands-on case studies, action steps, and resource guides so that your LAA is ready at a moment’s notice.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Hear about how one LAA reacted after a natural disaster to support artists in need.
  2. Learn more about how to get prepared before disaster strikes.
  3. Explore the Creative Placekeeping Guide and discuss how agencies can lead their communities back to health after disaster.

#aftacon

Presenters
Renee Chatelain
President & CEO
Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge
Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Renee Chatelain is a graduate of Louisiana State University, holding both a B.A. Degree in History and a Juris Doctor. She is President/CEO of the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge.  Renee began her career as a professional dancer and has been a guest teacher for Iceland Dance Theater, Cornell University, among others.  She has been a speaker at the Women in Dance Conference and at the Ballet Festival of India in Mumbai. She serves on the Advisory Board of the American Mural Project, supporting visual artist Ellen Griesedieck.  She has served as Executive Director of Manship Theatre and founded dance programs for two independent schools in Baton Rouge.   Renee is a recipient of the John W. Barton, Sr. Award for Excellence in Non-profit Management, and has been recognized by the Louisiana State Senate for her contribution to African Americans in Louisiana through the Arts.  Most recently, Renee received the Milestone Award from the National Guild for Community Arts Education.

Renee considers her passion project the creation and staging of The Fading Line: A Commemoration of the 1953 Baton Rouge Bus Boycott and is grateful to all of those who know the importance of supporting and advocating for the art.

Workshop

The Workshop format an opportunity for one person to lead a group of attendees in a college-style seminar and hands-on learning activity. Approximately half of the session should be training and providing examples, and the other half should be devoted to a multi-part exercise that allows attendees to develop an actionable plan for tackling an issue they're having in their organization.
How to Write a Public Art Emergency Preparedness Plan
Friday, June 14, 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

In a natural or manmade community disaster, art in public space is often at risk. Do you have a plan to address such emergencies? In this workshop, take the first steps towards developing your own Public Art Emergency Preparedness Plan!

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn the basic components to consider when crafting an emergency preparedness plan for public art.
  2. Talk through what stakeholders need to both develop and implement these plans.
  3. Hear examples of public art (and other) emergency preparedness plans and how they worked.

#aftacon

Readability as a Tool for Access and Equity
Friday, June 14, 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Every arts organization wants to be more inclusive but do the words we use to communicate keep people from taking part in our programs and services? Marketing and communication materials often require high levels of education and insider knowledge from readers, excluding potential audiences. This presentation explores how text can create barriers to inclusion andaudience development, and what we can do about it.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how text that is difficult to read alienates current and potential audiences.
  2. Discover how to evaluate the readability of your own text.
  3. Gain skills to improve the readability of your own text.

#aftacon

Presenters
Rob Maguire
Director, Marketing + Communications
Emily Carr University of Art + Design

Rob Maguire is the Director of Marketing and Communications at Emily Carr University of Art + Design in Vancouver, Canada. Before joining the university in 2017, he held marketing roles at Vancouver's renowned Museum of Anthropology and the Saskatchewan Jazz Festival, and taught copywriting at the University of British Columbia. Rob is particularly passionate about socially engaged art and cultural policy, and supports projects that seek to educate, inspire and build our communities. He also moonlights as the board president of Pi Theatre, a bold and uncompromising company based in Vancouver’s historic Chinatown.

Advocacy Rules of the Road
Friday, June 14, 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

June 2019 means that the 2020 election is just around the corner! This workshop will make clear what you can and can't do in terms of advocacy, decisionmaker education, and political activation.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Go over the electoral calendar, and hear about when you and your organization can have maximum impact.
  2. Gain clarity on what you can and can't do to convene, engage, and educate prospective and current political leaders.
  3. Workshop how your organization is going to be part of activating the arts in 2020 and beyond.

#aftacon

Presenters
Gustavo Herrera
Executive Director
Arts for LA
Los Angeles, California

Gustavo was appointed as Arts for LA’s Executive Director in December 2018. Prior to working with Arts for LA, he was the Western Regional Director for Young Invincibles (YI), where he was responsible for leading YI’s California offices, including its West Coast expansion. As director, he set strategic direction and advanced YI’s policy priorities on health care, higher education, jobs, and civic engagement for the region. Prior to Young Invincibles, Gustavo was the Chief Operating Officer (COO) of L.A. Plaza de Cultura y Artes (LAPCA), overseeing the day-to-day operation of a county museum, including the oversight of a master plan committee responsible for strategically developing three acres of additional museum campus. From 2010-2012, Gustavo served as the Director of Organizational Development for the Maestro Foundation, a classical music and performance arts organization. Gustavo holds a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree from American Jewish University and a dual Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies with an emphasis in socio-politics and economics and Art History from the University of California Santa Barbara. He serves on several state and local boards.

Creating Dedicated Funding Streams
Friday, June 14, 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

In this lead up to 2020, now is the time to pursue local dedicated funding streams for arts and culture. This session will guide you in planning from the details of crafting and listing ballot measures to the importance of marketing and community engagement.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn the "when" and "how" of pursuing voter-based efforts like ballot measures and millages.
  2. Hear how artists, arts organizations, administrators, and community coalitions come together and create advocates for arts funding.
  3. Learn more about the relationship between marketing and public relations and successful efforts to create dedicated funding streams.

#aftacon

Brushing Up Your HR Toolkit
Saturday, June 15, 1:45 pm - 3:00 pm

With shifts and changes in laws and policies around HR, as well as an evolution in expectations and needs for new workers, now is the perfect time to reflect on your HR policies and practices. This session will touch on hiring, onboarding, and engagement/retention practices, as well as evaluation and review.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Hear about legal changes and new policies and practices that will affect your HR.
  2. Discuss how generational and demographic shift requires flexibility and training, and learn about new resources.
  3. Connect to others who are working to make their HR more responsive and impactful.

#aftacon

Incubating Local Talent to Grow the Creative Economy
Saturday, June 15, 4:45 pm - 6:00 pm

In this interactive session, talk about—and practice!—tools, and tips for incubating local talent in your own region and raising the capacity of the public arts ecosystem to feed the local economy.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how you can foster learning for emerging artists and arts educators in your community.
  2. Hear about existing national and local resources to help you succeed.
  3. Do hands-on experimentation with some of the tools and guides.

#aftacon

Presenters
Jen Krava
Director of Programming
Forecast
St. Paul, Minnesota

Jen Krava is Director of Programming + New Initiatives at Forecast. She holds a Master in Design Studies, with a focus on Art, Design and the Public Domain from Harvard Graduate School of Design, where she graduated with commendation. She also holds a Master in Landscape Architecture from the University of Minnesota College of Design, and was a 2011 Yale studio painting research fellow.


As Director of Programming + New Initiatives, Jen sets the vision and strategy for all programming at Forecast. She also facilitates RFQ and artist selection processes, writes public art master plans, manages the artist grant program, and creates and facilitates in person workshops and trainings.


Jen is an Adjunct Professor in the College of Design at the University of Minnesota, co-editor of _SCAPE, ASLA-MN’s publication, and a visual artist, studying the body as a site, performative garments, and analog technologies.

You Should Think About Running for Local Political Office
Saturday, June 15, 4:45 pm - 6:00 pm

When you think about where policy decisions are made that directly affect your community, the local places--county commissions, school boards, supervisor boards, etc--are a primary place that comes up. In this workshop, walk through step-by-step planning on how you can become part of the public policymaking in your community as a local elected official.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn more about what the steps are to run for local office.
  2. Explore what being in local office means, how much time it takes, and why it might be right for you.
  3. Create a plan for yourself or someone you know to get the ball rolling on becoming part of local-level policymaking.

#aftacon

Actually Using the Data Piling Up on that Desk
Sunday, June 16, 9:00 am - 10:30 am

At the organizational and the community level the arts sector is creating robust data sets that can answer urgent questions—f you can ever get around to analyzing them! In this session, learn how to address lack of skills, tools, and time within LAAs and their communities.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about free community partners that help nonprofits build capacity and address existing datasets.
  2. Explore how to build research questions and think through what data already exists.
  3. See what new opportunities for thinking about data are emerging, including drawing qualitative data out of grant applications, working with traditionally marginalized communities, and new collaboration.

#aftacon

Presenters
Bronwyn Mauldin
Director of Research & Evaluation
LA County Arts Commission
Los Angeles, California

Bronwyn Mauldin is Director of Research and Evaluation at the Los Angeles County Arts Commission where she oversees a team that utilizes data and social science research methods to improve the Arts Commission’s work and strengthen the arts ecology. She is a key instigator behind LA’s annual Arts Datathon. Bronwyn has spent her career conducting applied research and evaluation for nonprofits, philanthropies, and government. She also teaches research methods to graduate arts management students for Sotheby’s Institute of Art at Claremont Graduate University. Prior to the Arts Commission, Bronwyn evaluated farmworker programs in California’s Central Valley, studied employment conditions for truck drivers in the Pacific Northwest, analyzed apprenticeship opportunities in the healthcare industry, served as a nonpartisan policy analyst in the Washington State House of Representatives and researched villager organizing in rural northeast Thailand. Bronwyn is also a novelist and zine maker.

Gregory Burbidge
Research & Policy Manager
Calgary Arts Development

Gregory Burbidge (he/him/his) is a Research & Policy Specialist at Calgary Arts Development. In this role he is responsible for the management of research and policy projects that support the indicators and outcomes related to Calgary Art Development’s strategic plan. This work also includes supporting the development of data and evaluative tools for use by the arts community. People in the office are happiest with Gregory when he brings his dogs Scout and Zadie with him to work.


Prior to joining Calgary Arts Development, Gregory served as a Principal Program Specialist at the Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC), building a program around the ARC board’s vision for a regional focus on arts and culture planning. This work included managing the Arts Leaders of Metro Atlanta program, the Atlanta Regional Public Art Program, the Atlanta Tessitura Consortium, and managing the Metro Atlanta Cultural Forums.


Born in the wilds of northern Canada, Gregory spent his early professional life as a gold miner. In his spare time, he enjoys playing board games, spending time with his wife, Christina, and creating art with textiles, an artistic practice that intertwines his interests in mathematics, sheepherding, and wearable art.

How to Make and Use a Theory of Change
Sunday, June 16, 9:00 am - 10:30 am

What impacts should your work have? Why do certain programs/projects lead to their desired impacts and others don't? Learn about how Theories of Change are made, what they're for, why they're important, and what happens once you've made one.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the components and usefulness of a Theory of Change.
  2. Hear concrete examples from arts organization staff working with an outside consultant.
  3. Learn about how Theories of Change can be used on projects large and small.

#aftacon

Presenters
Anika Kwinana
Manager, National Partnerships
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
Washington, District of Columbia

Anika Kwinana is an artist and arts manager who is passionate about the role of the arts in supporting community development.  Her work has included directing music and arts programming for a diverse, 5,000-member religious organization in South Africa, where she mentored and led 100+ volunteer artists; produced, wrote for and performed on two live CD-DVD projects; and, oversaw concerts, conferences and facility rentals. 

She also managed, facilitated and fundraised for several community-based youth, HIV-AIDS, and women’s empowerment organizations in the country.  In the U.S, Anika has designed and implemented STEM and arts-related college and career fairs, with an emphasis on concept development; event management; committee oversight; program design and implementation; and, partnership-building.  She is currently Manager, National Partnerships at The John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts, where she co-leads the Any Given Child Initiative, supporting 27 communities, nationally, towards equitable access to quality arts education for all K – 8 students.  Anika is a Commissioner for the Arlington County Commission for the Arts and an executive board member for the Arts Administrators of Color Network.  Anika holds an M.A. in Arts Management from George Mason University and an M.A. Public Anthropology from American University.