Tour 3: 38th & Chicago: How Artists are Transforming Place

Thursday, June 13, 1:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Register for a Public Art Preconference Tour to participate in an interactive learning experience out in the Twin Cities. The tours provide in-depth exploration of specific topics that are relevant to today’s public art practitioners, artists, planners, and others working at the intersection of art, policy and the built environment and civic ecosystem. Each tour includes a deep-dive grounding in the topic before heading out to explore different areas of the Twin Cities. Attendees must sign-up for a tour during the registration process.

38th & Chicago: How Artists are Transforming Place

Tour Description: Artists and arts and cultural organizations can be a catalyst for building community. In this tour, attendees will visit the 38th and Chicago area of Minneapolis to learn how an artist-initiated gallery has supported community building and grass roots cultural planning. In 2006, a community development plan for the neighborhood helped launch a new wave of arts and cultural activity including the implementation of two new arts spaces. Today, after over a decade of work from artists, additional community plans including the latest in 2017, and the work of political leaders and others learn how the area has changed and provides services and support to the surrounding neighborhoods.


To start off the tour, at the hotel attendees will hear from two experiences artists whose community development work has impacted communities around the country, and from Andrea Jenkins, an artist and current Minneapolis city councilmember whose drive built the community development work that will be experienced on this tour. From there, participants will travel with local tour leads to explore the 38th & Chicago Neighborhood to learn about and see the impact of artists-driven community development and cultural planning. Attendees will gather at the Pillsbury House + Theatre to learn about this Minneapolis institution built on the tradition of creating art in collaboration with community uses theater to inspire choice, change and connection. From there participants will walk a few blocks to the Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center, a training and resource facility for new and established artists on the fine and industrial art forms that are produced using heat, spark, or flame—collectively known as "fire arts" and how they are growing public artists in the Twin Cities. The last stop of the tour will be at photographer, public artist and social practice artist Wing Huie’s Third Place Gallery. While there, attendees will hear about his work in community take part in a social practice exercise.

 
Attendees with their tour leads will have the option to return to the hotel and discuss their learnings and observations from the tour.

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how artists can play an active role in neighborhood planning and community development.
  • See the long-term positive impact that artists can play in the growth and development of a community.
  • Hear from experts on how to incorporate artists into neighborhood planning projects.

Preparation: All tours will leave the hotel. Transportation is provided to and from the hotel. Attendees should plan to wear comfortable clothing and footwear. Tours will take place regardless of weather, so dress appropriately. Bring a camera or phone to capture and share your experience.
 

#aftacon

Presenters
James Rojas
Artist
Place It!

James is an urban planner, community activist, educator, and artist who facilitates community engagement activities for under presented communities Through Place It!, he has developed an interdisciplinary, community-healing, visioning, and process that uses storytelling, objects, art-production, and play for visual and spatial thinkers to help improve the urban-planning outreach process. He is now an international expert in public engagement and has traveled around the US, Mexico, Canada, Europe, and South America, facilitating over 1000 workshops, and building 100+ interactive models. Many of his clients are women, men of color, and others from disadvantaged and underserved communities. As such, he has collaborated with municipalities, non-profits, community groups, educational institutions, and museums, to engage, educate, and empower the public on transportation, housing, open space and health issues.

Con Christeson
Artist

I am an artist who works in community. I explore and experience community by observing people and the pools of knowledge and experience that exist there.  Historical rootedness is part of this complex concept of place. A topographical map of winds, weathers, and time. The science of hard scape. Then come the layers of memory and story in the vessel that holds people, space, and place.
 
Community can reinforce or bury the human experience.  Arts collaboration in community supports creativity, consciousness, and co-creation. I work locally, nationally, and internationally around and between those virtual lines we draw on the surface of our planet. They are not real, and yet, they slow us, confine us, stop us, turn us away from each other.

Art turns us towards each other.

Art serves.

Wing Huie
Artist
Third Place Gallery

 For over 35 years, celebrated photographer Wing Young Huie has captured the complex cultural realities of American society. He has exhibited nationally and internationally– over half a million people viewed his traveling exhibit in China – but his best known works, Lake Street USA and the University Avenue Project, were epic public art projects that transformed Twin Cities’ thoroughfares into six-mile galleries, reflecting the everyday lives of thousands of its citizens.
 

The StarTribune named Wing “Artist of the Year” in 2000, stating, “Lake Street USA is likely to stand as a milestone in the history of photography and public art.” In 2018 he was honored with the McKnight Distinguished Artist Award.
 

“Chinese-ness: The Meanings of Identity and the Nature of Belonging” (MHS Press, 2018) is his seventh and most personal book: “I am the youngest of six and the only one in my family not born in China. Instead, I was conceived and oriented in Duluth, Minnesota. So what am I? How does my Chinese-ness collide with my Minnesota-ness and my American-ness? And who gets to define those abstract hyphenated nouns?“

Heather Doyle
Artistic Director
Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Heather Doyle (Artistic Director) and Victoria Lauing (Executive Director) founded the Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center (CAFAC) with a group of neighbors in 2007. Inspired by the 38th & Chicago Small Area Plan, a resident-driven document created to guide development around this neighborhood commercial node, CAFAC's founders combined their experience in metalworking and education with a desire to use arts-based community development as a means for regeneration of a neighborhood impacted by decades of disinvestment. CAFAC focuses its work on three pillars: education, artist support, and public art, which together create a platform for community-driven resources and social impact. As Artistic Director, Heather Doyle brings decades of experience as an artist and metalworker, and directs CAFAC's public art initiatives as well as teaches blacksmithing and welding to youth and adults. Victoria Lauing, Executive Director, has more than 20 years experience in higher education with a focus on continuing education and professional training, and oversees the organization's management and development functions.
 

Victoria Lauing
Executive Director
Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Heather Doyle (Artistic Director) and Victoria Lauing (Executive Director) founded the Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center (CAFAC) with a group of neighbors in 2007. Inspired by the 38th & Chicago Small Area Plan, a resident-driven document created to guide development around this neighborhood commercial node, CAFAC's founders combined their experience in metalworking and education with a desire to use arts-based community development as a means for regeneration of a neighborhood impacted by decades of disinvestment. CAFAC focuses its work on three pillars: education, artist support, and public art, which together create a platform for community-driven resources and social impact. As Artistic Director, Heather Doyle brings decades of experience as an artist and metalworker, and directs CAFAC's public art initiatives as well as teaches blacksmithing and welding to youth and adults. Victoria Lauing, Executive Director, has more than 20 years experience in higher education with a focus on continuing education and professional training, and oversees the organization's management and development functions.